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Top 10 Sega Game Gear Games

VO: Dan Paradis
Script written by Kurt Hvorup It may have had its flaws, but Sega's 8-bit portable system definitely had some gems in its game library. Join WatchMojo.com as we countdown our picks for the Top 10 Sega Game Gear Games. For this list we're taking a look at what we feel are the finest titles available for the Sega Game Gear. Ranging in genre, scope and style, these games defined their system while being interesting in their own right. Normally for lists like this we would normally exclude ports, but since the Game Gear’s exclusive library was very limited ports will be allowed. Special Thanks to our users "Jordan Brown" "Allan Trinidad" "DeMonte Mays" & "Emily Nichole Cameron" for suggesting this topic on our Interactive Suggestion Tool at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Script written by Kurt Hvorup

Top 10 Sega Game Gear Video Games


It may have had its flaws, but Sega's 8-bit portable system definitely had some gems in its game library. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 Sega Game Gear Video Games.

For this list we're taking a look at what we feel are the finest titles available for the Sega Game Gear. Ranging in genre, scope and style, these games defined their system while being interesting in their own right. Normally for lists like this we would normally exclude ports, but since the Game Gear’s exclusive library was very limited ports will be allowed.

#10: “Ax Battler: A Legend of Golden Axe” (1991)

Going by this game, a new handheld calls for a new gameplay formula. In this spinoff of the “Golden Axe” series, you are cast as Ax Battler, the barbarian warrior from the original “Golden Axe”. Ax Battler's quest to retrieve the magical Golden Axe from the evil Death Adder takes him through a variety of locales – from caves, to forests and mountains, and onward. The most unique aspect of “Ax Battler” is the shift from beat-em-up gameplay to a mix of overworld exploration and side-scrolling combat rooted in series conventions. It's an engaging combination of elements new and old.

#9: “Lemmings” (1992)

Ah, to command an army of tiny adorable rodents. “Lemmings” for the Game Gear embodies the experience of the original PC title, which involves helping a line of human-like lemmings get to each level's exit. Where things get tricky is in the obstacles: the lemmings must avoid hazards such as lava pools, dropping from a high height and other traps in levels. From the use of special skills on lemmings to accounting for each level's difficulty, there's no shortage of challenge or fun to be had with this puzzle game.

#8: “Micro Machines 2: Turbo Tournament” (1995)

As a miniaturised port of the console counterparts, this is a quirky little title. “Micro Machines 2” takes the top-down track racing gameplay of its predecessor and expands upon it. The game's drivable toy cars now require different handling techniques based on which course is selected. Additionally, “Turbo Tournament” also sees the introduction of non-car vehicles, such as hovercraft and helicopters. With its light refinements to series elements and its embrace of the fun of toy cars, “Micro Machines 2” has a solid place on the Game Gear.

#7: “X-Men” (1994)

With respect to “X-Men: Gamesmaster's Legacy”, this is the more stand-out title. Exclusive to the Game Gear, “X-Men” pits the titular team against the likes of Magneto, Sebastian Shaw, Callisto and other iconic foes. What's interesting about the game is the way in which its beat-em-up combat is paired with suitably lengthy and visually distinct levels, creating a size-able and fulfilling experience for players. On top of that, members of the X-Men besides Cyclops and Wolverine can be unlocked through completing levels – letting people select from a fair cast of characters.

#6: “Arena: Maze of Death” (1996)

The future is terrifying... but also awesome, in a sense. “Arena: Maze of Death” operates on this mentality, showing a version of Earth circa 2026 in which a TV network has brainwashed the populace. Pro-democracy citizen Guy Freelander takes on the task of running an incriminating tape to a broadcast location... which means battling through multiple heavily-guarded zones. “Maze of Death” uses its isometric perspective and dystopian angle to great effect, creating an action-centric experience where survival is uncertain and the odds are overwhelming. At the very least, it's memorable.

#5: “Tails Adventure” (1995)

As the third game to feature Sonic the Hedgehog's sidekick Tails as the singular hero, “Tails Adventure” is quite remarkable. Different from other spin-offs, the game features a mix of platforming and role-playing mechanics. As Tails, you not only traverse environments but also collect useful items, manage Tails' Health Points and explore stages via backtracking. Yet this shift from convention works, both because of the fun of discovery and because the game world's colourful design and level of detail makes it a treat to experience. Keep on flying with pride, Tails.

#4: “Mega Man” (1995)

Make no mistake: in spite of the name, this isn't a remake of the original “Mega Man”. Built as more of a fusion of “Mega Man 4” and “Mega Man 5”, this Game Gear release serves as a mash-up of franchise tropes. The 1995 game “Mega Man” was designed for difficulty; besides the usual mix of shooting and platforming, the game also lacks continues and includes vertical scrolling to up the ante. This boosted challenge, coupled with impressive 8-bit visuals, makes for a fitting addition to the Blue Bomber's classic adventures.

#3: “Lunar: Samposura Gakuen” (1995)

Translation: “Lunar: Walking School”
Only officially released in Japan, this is something of note. One of the rare role-playing titles for the Game Gear, “Lunar: Walking School” follows a girl named Ellie as she and her friend investigate a seemingly abandoned magic school. Divided into twelve chapters, the bulk of the game is centred around battling monsters via a first-person interface, gaining magic and other skills as the characters level up. With built-in intrigue, visual roots in classic RPGs and a lively cast, “Walking School” catches our eye in more ways than one.

#2: “The G.G. Shinobi” (1991)

Fight on, Joe Musashi. The first game in the “Shinobi” series released for a portable system, “The G.G. Shinobi” does its best to honour its franchise's legacy. As the modern ninja Joe Musashi, you must platform through a series of treacherous stages in order to rescue Joe's fellow ninjas – and upon doing so, gain the ability to play as each rescued ninja. The varied weapons, abilities and ninjitsu available to players here makes the game's noteworthy difficulty rewarding, and the element of choice is certainly welcome.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:

“Fantasy Zone” (1991)
“Space Harrier” (1991)
“Vampire: Master of Darkness” (1993)
“Legend of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse” (1995)
“Virtua Fighter Animation” (1996)

#1: “Sonic the Hedgehog 2” (1992)

Call it predictable to put a Sonic game at the top spot, but you can be sure this game has its own distinct quirks and merits rather than a shameless Genesis port. “Sonic the Hedgehog 2” takes the first Game Gear instalment's fast-paced level traversal and refines it, with features such as the ability to recollect lost rings when injured. Each of the game's seven zones are split into three acts, culminating in a variable boss battle. Add in zone-centric mechanics and hidden bonuses throughout, and you have a game that pays tribute to its franchise while blazing its own trail.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite Game Gear video game? For more gaming Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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