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Top 10 DC Stories That NEED To Be Adapted Into Animated Movies

VO: Adrian Sousa WRITTEN BY: Ryan Woods
Written by Ryan Woods These are the epic tales worthy of being DC’s next foray into animation. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 10 DC Stories That Need To Be Adapted Into Animated Movies. For this list, we’ll be looking at the best and most fitting stories in the DC Comics vault that have yet to be turned into full-length animated films. Disregarding stories that have already adapted in animation before, this list will include both canonical and Elseworlds stories from the DC mythos. Have an idea you want to see made into a WatchMojo video? Check out our suggest page at http://WatchMojo.comsuggest and submit your idea.
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These are the epic tales worthy of being DC’s next foray into animation. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 10 DC Stories That Need To Be Adapted Into Animated Movies.

For this list, we’ll be looking at the best and most fitting stories in the DC Comics vault that have yet to be turned into full-length animated films. Disregarding stories that have already adapted in animation before, this list will include both canonical and Elseworlds stories from the DC mythos.

#10: “Batman: The War of Jokes and Riddles” (2017)


Batman undoubtedly has the greatest rogues gallery in the DC universe, so anytime we get to see the Dark Knight’s foes clash is a real treat. Told as a flashback following DC’s Rebirth event, “The War of Jokes and Riddles” tells the tale of a feud between the Riddler and the Joker during the early days of Batman’s war on crime. Since both villains refuse to let anyone else be responsible for slaying the Batman, Joker and Riddler amass their own private armies and begin a gangland war with an appropriately high body count. Bloody, two-fisted and downright vicious, this is a Batman tale worthy of an R-rated animated film.

#9: “Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters” (1987)


Another DC classic which probably would be best served with an R-rating, this Green Arrow tale is a dark, harrowing story of drugs, murder, and suicide.“The Longbow Hunters” sees Green Arrow on the trail of a serial killer targeting prostitutes while Black Canary begins infiltrating a ruthless drug cartel. Naturally, the two heroes’ paths end up converging as they deal with their own adversaries as well as the vengeful assassin Shado. Marking Green Arrow’s first foray into using lethal force, this gritty street-level story proved so popular that it led to the Emerald Archer receiving his first ongoing series.

#8: “Batman: Knightfall” (1993-94)


The word “epic” gets thrown around a lot these days, but no better word describes “Knightfall”. One of the darkest Batman tales ever told, “Knightfall” chronicles Bane’s rise to power in Gotham after he destroys Arkham Asylum, drives Batman to the point of sheer exhaustion and finally breaks his back. Bruce Wayne then relinquishes the Mantle of the Bat to the unstable Jean-Paul Valley, who becomes an even darker Batman and begins his own reign of terror over Gotham. Given its length, it would likely need to be adapted into two films like “The Dark Knight Returns” parts 1 and 2, the “Knightfall” saga is deserving of the very best animated treatment.

#7: “JLA: Rock of Ages” (1997-98)


One of the standouts from Grant Morrison’s run on the revamped Justice League, “Rock of Ages” pits the League against Lex Luthor’s Injustice Gang. Primarily revolving around Luthor’s possession of the Philosopher’s Stone, “Rock of Ages” sends The Flash, Green Lantern and Aquaman on a time-traveling adventure to a future where Earth has been conquered by Darkseid. In addition to providing a whirlwind of superhero action, “Rock of Ages” also weaves together numerous subplots involving newer League members like Aztek, Kyle Rayner, and Connor Hawke II that we’d love to see finally be a part of a DC animated feature.

#6: “Crisis on Infinite Earths” (1985-86)


One of the most ambitious comic book story-arcs ever, “Crisis on Infinite Earths” was DC’s first attempt to simplify its at-times confusing continuity. When the god-like Anti-Monitor sets out to become the single ruler of the multiverse, heroes from all across it join forces to halt the unthinkable destruction. Countless worlds are wiped from existence in the ensuing battle and among the casualties are Barry Allen and Supergirl, deaths that resonated throughout the DC universe for years afterward. Due to its cast of thousands, we have a hard time imagining “Crisis” would be filmable in live action, which makes an animated adaptation all the more appealing.

#5: “Kingdom Come” (1996)


A powerful critique of the Dark Age of Comics, this epic, written by Mark Waid and painted by Alex Ross, is both a literary and artistic triumph. In a not-so-distant future, the superheroes of old have retired and a new generation of brutal vigilantes have taken their place. After a disaster involving the controversial hero Magog leaves millions dead, Superman returns to the public eye in order to reign in the bloodthirsty antiheroes. Featuring a massive cast of classic and new versions of DC’s pantheon, “Kingdom Come” is a powerful discussion of what it means to be a hero that begs to become a cinematic reality.

#4: “Superman: Red Son” (2003)


One of DC’s most famous “what-if?” stories, “Red Son” is an Elseworlds tale that speculates what the world would be like if Superman had been raised in the Soviet Union. Written by Mark Millar, “Red Son” is far more than your average anti-communist propaganda tale. The story depicts a Man of Steel who still very much wants to do the right thing but simply has a different set of values guiding his heroic deeds, which inevitably leads to personal and political conflict. Told over the course of half a century, “Red Son” also features Cold War reimaginings of classic characters like Lex Luthor, Batman and Wonder Woman in this epic and deeply philosophical story.

#3: “Batman: The Long Halloween”(1996-97)


A masterfully told mystery story that is as dark as it is mesmerizing, “The Long Halloween” is an incredibly immersive Batman story that rewards multiple readings. Centered on a young Dark Knight’s hunt for the mysterious serial killer Holiday, “The Long Halloween” also chronicles the combined efforts of Batman, Harvey Dent, and Commissioner Gordon to halt the conflict between the warring Falcone and Maroni crime families. The story also serves as a thoughtful examination of Harvey Dent’s descent into madness as the corrupting influence of Batman’s presence in Gotham begins to surface. With a plot to rival any blockbuster thriller, “The Long Halloween” would be a welcome addition to DC’s animated films.

#2: “Blackest Night” (2009-10)


Rarely is a major comic book event as harrowing and horrifying as the instant classic “Blackest Night”. A milestone event for DC Comics in terms of resurrecting long-dead characters, this haunting tale of terror saw the combined forces of DC’s heroes and various Lantern Corps defend Earth against Nekron and his undead Black Lanterns. Using both living and deceased heroes as his agents, Nekron sets in motion a plan to wipe out the god-like Entity and thereby kill every living thing in the universe. Combining themes of horror, apocalypse and the value of life, “Blackest Night” is a uniquely DC story which would surely make for an enthralling animated film.

#1: “Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth” (1989)


Lauded by many fans as a spellbinding masterpiece, this nightmarish tale from writer Grant Morrison and artist Dave McKean took us into the darkest corners of DC’s infamous home for the criminally insane. After Arkham’s inmates take over the Asylum and threaten the murder the staff, Batman enters the madhouse alone to rescue the hostages. What follows is a deeply psychological exploration of the insanity behind the Dark Knight’s greatest foes and the history of Arkham itself. Though adapting such a unique narrative and finding a way to translate McKean’s artwork while staying true to the source, “Arkham Asylum’s” rich visuals and even richer story would make for a tremendous animated film.
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