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Top 10 Greatest British Comedy Characters of All Time

VO: Richard Bush
Written by Richard Bush These are the funniest faces on TV. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 greatest british comedy characters of all time. For this list, we’ll be taking a look at Britain's biggest TV comedies and picking the funniest, most memorable and most iconic characters from their line-ups. And just to be clear, we are sticking to just one character per show - and one entry per actor. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Greatest British Comedy Characters of All Time


These are the funniest faces on TV. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 greatest british comedy characters of all time.

For this list, we’ll be taking a look at Britain's biggest TV comedies and picking the funniest, most memorable and most iconic characters from their line-ups. And just to be clear, we are sticking to just one character per show - and one entry per actor.

#10: Super Hans
“Peep Show” (2003-2015)

A bohemian, recreational drug user who’s either spitting out strangely insightful life lessons or just talking utter rubbish, Super Hans is the inadvertently hilarious friend of Jez and Mark. Whether he’s laying down some experimental music or trying his very hardest to come off the crack, Matt King’s Hans is by far the funniest character in the show, and he never fails to shake things up at a moment's notice. We may not like to admit it, but he’s quite relatable at times, too.

#9: Hyacinth Bucket
“Keeping Up Appearances” (1990-95)

The seminal social climber, Hyacinth Bucket was the height of high society - or, at least she thought she was. Always looking for an opportunity to boast, and to prove that she is worthy of her posh-but-fake accent, Bucket, or is that ‘bouquet’, was central to some of the most memorable scenes in '90s comedy. Forever gloating about her latest purchases, always trying to hide her true heritage and generally annoying the life out of her husband, she was a real one-off.

#8: Malcolm Tucker
“The Thick of It” (2005-2012)

You think you’ve been berated at work - you don’t know the half of it. Tasked with managing the public perception of the Department of Social Affairs and Citizenship, Malcolm Tucker is always boiling with rage, brimming with swear words and ready to snap at absolutely anyone who gets on his wrong side. Brought to eye-bulging life by Peter Capaldi, Tucker's outrageous aggression is what sets him apart. If this bloke smiles at you, prepare for one hell of a dressing down.

#7: Rick
“The Young Ones” (1982-84)

Poet, motivational speaker, anarchist - well, that’s what he calls himself, anyway. One of four students living in squalid accommodation, Rick routinely proves himself to be the loser of the group - although he'll never admit it. He's usually off the mark when it comes to intellectual conversation, and he’s also excruciatingly annoying, but we can’t help but love him. We might've included many a Rik Mayall character today, but this guy best conveys the comic's larger (and louder) than life style.

#6: Lou and Andy
“Little Britain” (2003-07)

This sketch show has produced a long list of genius characters, but Lou and Andy are a standout pair. Played by the show’s creators, David Walliams and Matt Lucas, their sketches revolved around Andy's wheelchair, and his tendency to vacate it. Lou is none the wiser, of course. Cracking us up every time they were on screen, their exploits went beyond the show itself, as the double-act also popped up on TV adverts, and in various sketches for Comic Relief. Today, they're instantly recognisable, and they're two of the UK’s best loved characters.

#5: Alan Partridge
“I’m Alan Partridge” (1997-2002)

A serial supplier of bad TV and radio, Alan Partridge is the naff presenter who will offend just about anyone. The Steve Coogan character did feature in other shows, but it was the “I’m Alan Partridge” series that really let Partridge spread his wings. Whether he’s belittling his assistant, hosting a graveyard radio shift or trying (and failing) to flag down a friend - you can always rely on Alan to deliver a unique brand of awkward comedy and to ‘have the last laugh’.

#4: Mr. Bean
“Mr. Bean” (1990-95)

A weird and wonderful invention of Rowan Atkinson’s, Mr. Bean is a bona fide comedy icon. Turning everyday activities into a farcical free-for-all, his antics can be quite frustrating to watch, but they’re hysterical all the same. While other Atkinson characters were in contention for this countdown, Bean takes physical comedy to whole new level. His sketches speak for themselves - even if he doesn't.

#3: David Brent
“The Office” (2001-03)

A blueprint for cringe comedy, few British shows have earned acclaim comparable to "The Office". Fronted by Ricky Gervais’ David Brent, this mockumentary series centres on employees at a paper company and the uncomfortable day-to-day situations that arise - with Brent usually at the heart of all that is awkward. Sexist jokes, casual racism, no sense of personal space and certainly no control over his ‘indoor-voice’, Brent is a masterclass in comic timing.

#2: Derek 'Del Boy' Trotter
“Only Fools and Horses” (1981-2003)

We Brits love an underdog, don't we? Although “Only Fools” is littered with cracking characters, our vote has to go to David Jason’s Del Boy, the 24 carat wannabe yuppie. With an answer for everything, hooky goods for everyone and an aspiring brother at his side, he’s the wheeler dealer that’s had us in stitches more times than we can count. From buying faulty dolls to falling at the bar, his comedy is gold - even if his jewellery isn't.

#1: Basil Fawlty
“Fawlty Towers” (1975-79)

It may have only have ran for 12 episodes, but “Fawlty Towers” has had a lasting impact. Following the daily shambles at a hotel in Torquay, all of the show's characters are timeless and endlessly quotable. But it’s John Cleese’s Basil that musters up the most laughs. Frequently crashing around the hotel like a madman, and getting into heated debates with his guests, it’s Cleese turned up to 11. His hapless go-getter routine is often copied, but never bettered. He is our king of comedy.
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