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Top 10 Most Hated Songs in Britain

VO: Richard Bush WRITTEN BY: Sean Harris
Written by Alfie Bywater Prep your ears and pass the stress ball. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 most hated songs in Britain! For this list, we press play on the most detested, divisive and downright annoying records to ever plague the UK charts. While not every entry has been inflicted on us by a British artist, these tunes are intrinsically linked with the UK in one way or another. But, there’s no place for novelty records today – so we’ll keep the Crazy Frog to a minimum. Special thanks to our user WordToTheWes for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Most Hated Songs in Britain


Prep your ears and pass the stress ball. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 most hated songs in Britain!
For this list, we press play on the most detested, divisive and downright annoying records to ever plague the UK charts. While not every entry has been inflicted on us by a British artist, these tunes are intrinsically linked with the UK in one way or another. But, there’s no place for novelty records today – so we’ll keep the Crazy Frog to a minimum.

#10: “She’s So Lovely” (2007)
Scouting for Girls

Instantly recognisable within its first few notes, you couldn’t move for hearing this song in pubs, clubs, shops and supermarkets in 2007. A debut record for Scouting for Girls, “She’s So Lovely” charts the rise and rise of lead singer Roy Stride’s infatuation with an older woman – a story which is hammered home by a bunch of gawping blokes in the bowling alley video accompaniment. With repetitive lyrics and cheesy crescendos, it set a samey blueprint which the band have followed ever since. Heaven help us all.

#9: “Wonderwall” (1995)
Oasis

British bands don’t come much bigger than Oasis, but the ‘90s phenomenon gave one or two grating tunes – and “Wonderwall” is the worst offender. The go-to track for anyone who can’t play guitar but wants to make it look like they can, it’s a busker’s favourite but fans aren’t always as enthusiastic. While Liam’s snarling vocals have inspired plenty of singalongs, “Wonderwall” is the classic case of an OK track that gets seriously overplayed. We’re sure, we’ve heard it all before, and we’re starting to have some doubts.

#8: “Yellow” (2000)
Coldplay

A marmite band if ever there was one, although they’ve sold out stadiums around the world Coldplay have always had their critics. And “Yellow” is usually the song slated first. Taken from the band’s first album, it seems to drip with despair despite Chris Martin’s clearly romantic lyrics. Of course, the song catapulted Coldplay to massive success – which might be another reason why people pick it apart now. As one of the most divisive entries on today’s list, you either agree with Superhans, or you don’t.

#7: “Let ‘Em In” (1976)
Paul McCartney and Wings

OK, so very little blame should really fall at Paul McCartney’s door for this one – or at Billy Paul’s, for that matter. Up until those painful Postcode Lottery adverts, “Let ‘Em In” was just another passable pop record from the ‘70s. But today’s listener struggles to hear those happy-go-lucky lyrics without seeing D-list celebrities smiling stick-on grins on doorsteps up and down the country. It’s not the only song to be mercilessly mangled in the name of TV advertising, but even “Ice Ice Baby” has got nothing on this.

#6: “(Everything I Do) I Do It for You” (1991)
Bryan Adams

With a record-breaking 16 consecutive weeks as UK number one in 1991, this track experienced unparalleled popularity when it was released. But Bryan Adams’ ballad hasn’t aged all that well, and listeners are more likely to skip stations than sit through his heart-on-sleeve huskiness nowadays. Wet Wet Wet’s “Love Is All Around” suffered a similar fate. It almost equalled Adams’ record run in 1994, but quickly fell out of fashion, destined only for the dregs of late-night local radio. There’s a lot to thank the ‘90s for, but just not this.

#5: “Chelsea Dagger” (2006)
The Fratellis

The second single from The Fratellis’ debut album, “Costello Music”, this song has scored scorn on two counts. First, it’s synonymous with the wave of unoriginal, easy, try-hard indie rock which took over UK charts in the mid-2000s – ranked alongside the likes of “Ruby” by the Kaiser Chiefs and “America” by Razorlight. Second, thanks to its widespread use in various football chants, it’s a stereotypical soundtrack for the big match. But if you’re not a football fan, and you don’t dig the Jacamo ads[1], then it’s a song to quickly skip.

#4: “Blurred Lines” (2013)
Robin Thicke feat. T.I. and Pharrell

The ill feeling toward this track was by no means a British-only affair. “Blurred Lines” made international headlines, with critics claiming that its lyrics and video were misogynistic and supportive of rape culture. UK universities led a widespread boycott against the song, with more than 20 unis banning it from playlists at student events. However, those measures didn’t stop Thicke from topping the UK singles charts, and the song was played as if on repeat everywhere else you went, with the controversy seeming to aid sales.

#3: “The Climb” (2009)
Joe McElderry

It’s probably the least well-known song on today’s countdown, but for good reason. When Joe McElderry won “The X Factor” in 2009, he might’ve thought that he had that year’s Christmas number one in the bag. But, nope! A nationwide campaign led Rage Against the Machine to top spot, amidst growing resentment over “The X Factor”s stranglehold on the charts. And while McElderry was the one pipped by a protest, TV talent shows do have a lot to answer for, in general.

#2: “What Makes You Beautiful” (2011)
One Direction

To another alumnus of Britain’s TV talent shows, though the sales success of this boy band is second to none. One Direction have smashed all sorts of records since finishing third on “The X Factor” in 2010, starting their commercial crusade with this signature song in 2011. But for all their fans, 1D have garnered a dedicated horde of haters. They say the group (and this track) offers little more than splish-splash lyrics, churned out tunes and squeaky-clean smiles. Maybe that’s what makes them beautiful? Or are they just abominable?

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions.

“Could It Be Magic” (1992)
Take That

“Chasing Cars” (2006)
Snow Patrol

“Flying Without Wings” (1999)
Westlife

#1: “You’re Beautiful” (2005)
James Blunt

Our winner is another which speaks of beauty in its title, but delivers quite the opposite. From its opening refrain and mistimed intro, to the heavy-hearted hook and awkward ending, it’s basically one long whine masquerading as a love song. Even James Blunt himself has admitted it’s naff, often suggesting that he hates it too - but at least he can laugh about it. And critics continually rip apart the video, which sees Blunt take his shirt off in the rain before jumping in the sea – at least it’s in slow motion, we wouldn’t want to miss anything important.
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