Top 10 Crazy Television Fan Theories

Credits: Rebecca Brayton Andrew Labelle
What will the fans think of next? Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we will be counting down our picks for the Top 10 Bizarre Television Fan Theories. For this list, we will be looking at those theories about our favorite shows that fans have been debating about. We will stick to in-world theories, so if you think that “Firefly” was cancelled by the government or that “The Simpsons” predicted 9/11, you are looking at a list for another day.
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What will the fans think of next? Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we will be counting down our picks for the Top 10 Bizarre Television Fan Theories.

For this list, we will be looking at those theories about our favorite shows that fans have been debating about. We will stick to in-world theories, so if you think that “Firefly” was cancelled by the government or that “The Simpsons” predicted 9/11, you are looking at a list for another day.

#10: Time Warp

“The Simpsons” (1989- )
We all know the numerous and creepy ways “The Simpsons” has predicted real-life events. However, long-time fans of the decades-spanning series have also noticed a bizarre inconstancy. While it makes sense to keep the show contained in a certain time frame, not allowing the characters to grow old, how come the show is always aware of the technologies, trends, and
culture of the time it airs? The theory, backed by numerous Reddit users, is that Springfield is caught in a Time Warp, with its residents aware of the passing of time, but forever ageless themselves.

#9: Feeding on Children

“Sesame Street” (1969- )
Similar to “The Simpsons” theory, very perceptive viewers seemed to have noticed that the child residents of Sesame Street, while not ageless, seem to be disappearing and constantly replaced with new kids. This may be explained away by simple cast changes in the studio, but in the world of Sesame Street, the only morbid explanation is that these kids are slowly being fed to the Count. Are we to believe that all these kids who have come and gone live on the same little patch of city street? Has nobody notified the police about how they all suddenly go missing eventually?

#8: Who is the Scranton Strangler?

“The Office” (2005-13)
Some may call the Scranton Strangler a throwaway gag that ended up as a recurring joke. A mysterious and murderous strangler, in the quiet town of Scranton, has no place in a situational comedy… unless of course he is one of our main characters. Many have speculated as to the true identity of the Strangler, but most popular theory points to shy, quiet Toby from HR. Not only is he not around during crucial moments, such as the Strangler’s police car-chase, but he ends up claiming to have put an innocent man away after being on the Strangler jury.

#7: Prequel to “The Walking Dead”

“Breaking Bad” (2008-13)
Not only do fans love making connections between popular, fan-favorite shows, but showrunners also love dropping Easter Eggs in different properties. This could be a recipe for disaster on online forums. Not only is Daryl’s description of Merle’s drug dealer spot-on for Jesse from “Breaking Bad,” but early on in “The Walking Dead” we get a look at what seems like Walter White’s famous blue meth. While these might just be nods to their AMC sister show, fans have concluded that the blue meth caused the zombie outbreak, and that “Breaking Bad” is therefore a prequel to “The Walking Dead.”

#6: Atomic Testing

“SpongeBob SquarePants” (1999- )
We know that bizarre cartoons like “SpongeBob SquarePants” do not work in the rational universe. The moment we start questioning how half the things these guys do are possible underwater, we start losing our minds. This does not stop fans from needing answers as to how a sea sponge, a starfish, and other deep-sea creatures can walk and talk. Could it be they are the mutant results of some freak nuclear testing? Is Bikini Bottom actually located under the real-life famous nuclear test site, Bikini Atoll? Well, it’s always fun to theorize.

#5: Jessica Fletcher: Serial Killer

“Murder, She Wrote” (1984-96)
Jessica Fletcher was the modern day answer to Agatha Christie. A polite, middle-aged lady and successful mystery writer, who was also amazing at solving real-life murders, Jessica Fletcher always found herself in the wrong place at the wrong time. However, after 12 seasons, and over two hundred episodes, some viewers began to theorize… have the police never wondered how so many people have ended up dead around her? That is a lot of murder to be casually connected to. We guess it is not out of the question to claim that she needed material for her novels.

#4: The Fresh Prince is Dead

“The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” (1990-96)
This bizarre theory seems to have only one piece of evidence: the theme song. “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” was an immense hit in the 90s, and even kids these days can easily sing you Will Smith’s catchy theme song. “The Fresh Prince” rap was flipped, turned upside-down, and dissected by fans, because it seems many refused to believe that a poor kid from Philly could be sent to his rich relatives in Bel Air. The explanation? The gang fight actually left Will for dead. The cabbie then brought Will to his paradise, a world he never dreamed of: a mansion in Bel Air.

#3: Zack’s Fantasy

“Saved by the Bell” (1989-93)
Only die-hard fans will know that “Saved by the Bell” was somewhat of a spin-off to the much-lesser known “Good Morning, Miss Bliss.” However, this other show explains our next theory. Fan-favorites like Mr. Belding and Screech all returned in “Saved by the Bell”, but the biggest difference was the character of Zack Morris, who went from middle-school dork, to the coolest dude at Bayside High. The only possible explanation it seems is that the entirety of “Saved by the Bell” was younger Zack’s fantasy version of high school.

#2: The Hell Theory

“Gilligan’s Island” (1964-67)
A fan theory that has been making the rounds for decades, long-time viewers of “Gilligan’s Island” have picked up on various clues leading them to conclude that our castaways are stuck in Hell. Although people have been saying it about “Lost” for years, some “Gilligan” fans have decided that all their favorite characters died at the opening of the show, and are now stranded on an island representing the afterlife. For the cherry on top, let’s not forget that our castaways seem to fittingly symbolize the seven deadly sins, with Gilligan himself serving as Lucifer.

Before we reveal our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:

Dr. Claw was the First Inspector Gadget
“Inspector Gadget” (1983-86)

Dr. House is the Adult Doogie Howser
“House” (2004-12)

The Children Are in Angelica’s Imagination
“Rugrats” (1991-2006)

#1: Post-Apocalyptic Future

“The Flintstones” (1960-66) / “The Jetsons” (1962-63)
Two classic sitcoms from the 60s, not to mention two of the greatest cartoon families of all time. One taking place in the Stone Age, the other high above the clouds in a futuristic city. Although seemingly centuries apart, fans still found a way to connect these Hanna-Barbera properties, theorizing that the Flintstones and the Rubbles live in a post-apocalyptic wasteland, while rich families like the Jetsons created cities up in the clouds above them. However, this doesn’t explain the time-travelling 1987 movie, “The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones.”
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