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Top 10 Slow Dance Songs of the 2000s

VO: Rebecca Brayton
Script written by Aaron Cameron. Grab yourself a trucker hat and hold on tight to that cutie. For this list, we’re basing our choices on those songs that were popular at high school dances and/or prom celebrations during the decade in question. They’re sure to bring back lots of memories, whether they’re good, embarrassing or something else entirely. This is a part of a series of slow dance songs ranging from the 1970s to the 2000s. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top10 slow dance songs of the 2000s. Special thanks to our users This Chick, Jacob Levy and undying for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Script written by Aaron Cameron.


Top 10 Slow Dance Songs of the 2000s


Grab yourself a trucker hat and hold on to that cutie. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 slow dance songs of the 2000s.

For this list, we’re basing our choices on those songs that were popular at high school dances and/or prom celebrations during the decade in question. They’re sure to bring back lots of memories, whether they’re good, embarrassing or something else entirely. This is a part of a series of slow dance songs ranging from the 1970s to the 2000s.

#10: “Here Without You” (2003)
3 Doors Down

With the band’s first single “Kryptonite” on permanent repeat at the beginning of the decade, fans finally got to slow down when this lonesome ballad came out in 2003. Written by vocalist Brad Arnold, who was inspired by periods of separation between he and his then-wife, “Here Without You” became popular with military families in the United States as deployments increased during America’s post-911 wars and conflicts. Due to its openness and nonthreatening lyrics, the track also became a #1 hit on both the Billboard Adult Top 40 and Mainstream Top 40 charts as well as a top 5 entry on the Hot 100 chart.

#9: “U Got It Bad” (2001)
Usher

This slow jam was a #1 for one week in 2001, before being knocked down by Nickelback’s “How You Remind Me.” However, the recording artist and the song’s crisp digital groove came back with a vengeance and reclaimed the top spot one month later, riding that R&B wave for a further five weeks. Usher’s time at the top of the charts made him the only solo male artist to have a Billboard Hot 100 #1 that year – and it also ensured him a spot on the dance floor, bringing partners closer together ever since.

#8: “Apologize” (2007)
Timbaland feat. OneRepublic

Sometimes it’s all who you know, and these guys knew Tom. Already gaining traction as a band due to the MySpace scene, OneRepublic went full on massive when their debut’s lead single received the Timbaland treatment a few months later. The “Apologize” remix spent 25 weeks in the American top ten, hit #1 in much of the charting world and is to date the third most legally downloaded song in Germany. Vocalist Ryan Tedder claims that the song’s first verse came easily but that it took six months to finish the second, proving good things really do come to those who wait.

#7: “You’re Beautiful” (2005)
James Blunt

Although this track does appear in our list of Stalker songs, if you don’t know the story behind it, “You’re Beautiful” actually is kind of sweet, right? Besides, only choruses matter when it’s time to dance. The gentle track has James Blunt spending a lifetime in love after locking eyes with a beautiful woman for mere seconds - and that’s just wonderful. Topping the Billboard Hot 100, among other charts, the song’s warm, romantic sound has led to it being a popular wedding song as well as a slow-dance staple.

#6: “Yellow” (2000)
Coldplay

While singer Chris Martin frequently changes his story, the most repeated version says that the band was inspired to write this tune by a rare, clear starry night in Wales. The night’s sky triggered a melody and chord progression in Martin’s head, while the song’s title and hook-line were taken from a nearby book: the Yellow Pages. Regardless of how it came to be, “Yellow” was a welcomed top 10 hit in the UK and in high schools everywhere.

#5: “If I Ain’t Got You” (2004)
Alicia Keys

Inspired by the 2001 death of singer Aaliyah, this emotion-driven track was atop 5 Hot 100 hit for Alicia Keys and a #1 on the R&B charts. The song netted the songstress a Grammy for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance and has since been covered numerous times. Like the later “No One,” the jazzy and soul-infused number is also a perfect fit on any dance floor and was a soothing contrast to the conflict and hurt that pervaded the decade.

#4: “This I Promise You” (2000)
‘N Sync

Eons before JT brought sexy back, Justin Timberlake and his ‘N Sync associates were known for delivering harmonious and dance-friendly songs such as this. The track was not only the group’s fifth American top ten but also hit #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart. In need of songs for the boy band’s second album, their label contacted Richard Marx – he ended writing and producing the track and even recorded it himself on multiple occasions. As an artist, Marx also appears on our list of Slow Dance Songs of the ‘80s.

#3: “Hero” (2001)
Enrique Iglesias

A global hit when it was released in 2001, this ballad gained an entirely new meaning and weight following the 9/11 terrorist attacks just days later. Its soft sound and supportive lyrics seemed to be exactly what folks needed at the time. Reaching the Hot 100’s third position, “Hero” helped Enrique Iglesias gain momentum in the UK and continued his string of romantic Latin pop-flavoured successes suitable for the radio airwaves and the dance floor.

#2: “You and Me” (2005)
Lifehouse

A popular soft rock song from a decade of heavy sounds, this track also saved the band from its one-hit wonder status established with “Hanging by a Moment”. Set at delicately slow waltz-time tempo, a major key, and with an unchallenging chord progression, the tender acoustic ballad became an instant slow dance song, with an extended mix available for married-couples-to-be. “You and Me” was also popular outside of the chapel, topping both the Billboard Adult Top 40 and Adult Contemporary charts as well as placing in the top 5 of the Hot 100 and the Mainstream Top 40.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions.
- “Until the End of Time” (2006)
Justin Timberlake and Beyonce
- “Beautiful” (2002)
Christina Aguilera
- “Your Body Is a Wonderland” (2002)
John Mayer
- “The Only Exception” (2009)
Paramore
- “My Immortal” (2003)
Evanescence

#1: “Chasing Cars” (2006)
Snow Patrol

And now, grab your partner for one last dance. This song, and the band itself, gained significant attention in the United States after it was featured on popular shows like “One Tree Hill” and “Grey’s Anatomy.” This attention has translated into over three million copies of “Chasing Cars” being sold, #1 status on both Billboard Adult charts and top 10 entries on multiple country charts. But it’s undoubtedly the alt rock song’s romantic lyrics and fittingly simple but unforgettable atmosphere that land it here.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite slow dance song of the 2000s? For more sweet Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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