Related Videos

Top 10 UK Comedies You've Probably Never Heard Of

VO: RiB
Written by Richard Bush Dive beneath the mainstream and you’ll find these little treasures. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down the top 10 UK comedies you’ve probably never heard of. For this list, we’re focussing on those hilarious tv shows from the UK that for one reason or another have failed to enter the limelight and reach the same levels of popularity enjoyed by more conventional shows. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
Share
WatchMojo

You must register to a corporate account to download this video. Please login

Transcript

Top 10 UK Comedies You've Probably Never Heard Of


Dive beneath the mainstream and you’ll find these little treasures. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down the top 10 UK comedies you’ve probably never heard of.

For this list, we’re focussing on those hilarious tv shows from the UK that for one reason or another have failed to enter the limelight and reach the same levels of popularity enjoyed by more conventional shows.

#10: “Snuff Box” (2006)

Fans of absurd comedies will likely recognise the faces of Matt Berry and Rich Fulcher, but did you know they did a show together? Much like their other work, “Snuff Box” is dark, satirical and very weird, starring Berry and Fulcher as distorted versions of themselves, with a series of wacky sketches spliced in for good measure. Blurring the lines between what’s real and fake, and what you should and probably shouldn't laugh at, it’s laced with brilliant characters and sporadic musical numbers.

#9: “Jam” (2000)

If you like your comedy to carry a controversial edge, then get a load of “Jam”. Penned by Chris Morris of “The Day Today” and “Brass Eye”, in basic terms it’s a sketch show, but trust us when we say that this one is very surreal and very close to the bone. With many of the episodes touting criticism, due to questionable content such as infant death and highly sexual themes, “Jam” is certainly an acquired taste. And it’s definitely an example of Morris’ darker work.

#8: “Help” (2005)

With Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, many people favour one over the other. Well, for Whitehouse lovers, “Help” is a breath of fresh air. Teaming up with Christopher Langham, the series follows a psychotherapist, played by Langham, who is visited by a series of different patients, played by Whitehouse. The subtle back and forth dialogue showcases some brilliant, refreshingly raw writing. It’s not gung-ho, but it’s still a very clever series.

#7: “W1A” (2014-)

A show completely taking the mick out of the BBC and yet commissioned by the very same broadcaster. We don’t know how it got made either. But for those who enjoy a brutal look behind the scenes of the TV industry, “W1A” will be right up your street. Starring the likes of Hugh Bonneville and Jessica Hynes, it delves into new show ideas, company controversies and is littered with celebrity cameos. And most of the characters throughout are either narcissistic douchebags or just plain morons.

#6: “Monkey Dust” (2003-2005)

Moving away from linear sketches next for something that uses its cartoon formula for an unrealistic, fast-moving, shapeshifting comedy. Identifiable by its entertaining artwork and seamless transitions from one scene to the next, “Monkey Dust” is bursting with bizarre characters, ridiculous voice overs and taboo topics, including terrorism, paedophilia and racism. Seriously, this show plays out more like a weird dream than a tv show. It’s like “South Park” meets “Monty Python” on LSD.

#5: “Inside No. 9” (2014-)

Probably the most well-known entry on today’s list, it’s often overshadowed by Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith’s other work; “The League of Gentleman” and “Psychoville”. If you’re a fan of those shows, you’ll love this. A collection of completely unrelated stories lasting around half an hour, it’s filled with the duo’s trademark dark humour and clever comedy, as well as themes of anguish and death. If you want engrossing stories by two amazingly talented writers, but are short on time, give it a whirl.

#4: “Asylum” (1996)

Essentially a black comedy based in an asylum, with a famous comic playing each patient, this series moves from room to room, introducing zany characters and watching them bounce off one another. Unique in the fact that it gave stand-up acts a platform to showcase their talent and material, it features many funny people during their early careers, including Simon Pegg, Julian Barratt and Jessica Hynes. Oh, and it was created by Edgar Wright and David Walliams.

#3: “Noble and Silver: Get Off Me!” (2001)

Another jump behind the camera next, with a show about making a show. Created by Kim Noble and Stuart Silver, it hilariously delves into the problems writers and directors face when trying to create a tv show, from tussles for creative control to paying for celebrity cameos. It’s as meta as it comes, with many of the scenes cutting between sequences from their show and the tense moments afterwards when someone yells cut, all stitched together like a documentary-style college project. Brilliant.

#2: “Look Around You” (2002-2005)

At first glance, you might be fooled into thinking “Look Around You” is a genuine show from the 70s or 80s, and that’s the point. Satirising educational films and science shows of the time, it’s balance of recognisable imagery and ridiculous, nonsensical content make it both relatable and funny as hell. Created by Robert Popper and Peter Serafinowicz, it’s a seriously smart show that offers something completely different.

#1: “Garth Marenghi's Darkplace” (2004)

According to its self-proclaimed, genius creator, Garth Marenghi, played by Matthew Holness, “Darkplace” was a show rejected by Channel 4 due to its “radicality” - and not the fact that it was just pants. Another example of a spoof within a spoof, “Darkplace” features interviews with the show’s actors, played by Holness, Richard Ayoade and Matt Berry, interspersed with scenes of their cheesy 80s TV show which has finally been given the green light. It’s both pure trash and pure brilliance. Well, except for the bike chase, that’s flawless.
Comments

Sign in to access this feature

Related Blogs