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Top 10 British Comedy Films

VO: Richard Bush
Written by Richard Bush From the walking dead at the Winchester to the barely-clothed in Sheffield, these films had us in hysterics. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 British comedy films. For this list, we are focussing on the best, laugh out loud comedy films to hail from the British Isles, from classic Ealing comedies to raunchy rom coms. And just to be clear, we’re keeping to one entry per franchise. Special thanks to our user RichardFB for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 British Comedy Films


From the walking dead at the Winchester to the barely-clothed in Sheffield [3], these films had us in hysterics. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 British comedy films.

For this list, we are focussing on the best, laugh out loud comedy films to hail from the British Isles, from classic Ealing comedies to raunchy rom coms. And just to be clear, we’re keeping to one entry per franchise.

#10: “In the Loop” (2009)


We’re starting off a little leftfield, with a contemporary comedy about politics. After the British Cabinet Minister makes a controversial remark about war in the Middle East, political advisors come rushing in to clean up - one of which is Malcolm Tucker, yes, the same Malcolm Tucker from the series “The Thick of It”. With ruthless satire coming out of its ears, it will appeal to those who frequently get frustrated by the farce of bureaucratic faff. Like international relations, for example.

#9: “The Full Monty” (1997)


To a film about unemployed steel workers turned amateur male strippers next. Stay with us. Crude on the surface but superbly-written nonetheless, “The Full Monty” stars the likes of Robert Carlyle, Mark Addy and Tom Wilkinson, who with the help of a killer soundtrack and some revealing underwear, aim to keep themselves financially afloat. Filled with memorable visuals, dialogue and music - the latter of which it won an Oscar for - it’s stripped back comedy at its best.

#8: “The Return of the Pink Panther” (1975)


One of many films in the Inspector Clouseau saga, this film features Peter Sellers as the titular detective, who’s half Sherlock Holmes, and half Charlie Chaplin. With scenes excruciatingly frustrating, yet hilarious to watch, it’s a classic example of slapstick humour and of Sellers’ comic abilities. Whether he’s trying to pronounce a difficult word, find out where his servant is hiding or analysing a crime scene - you can always expect him to cock it up.

#7: “Four Weddings and a Funeral” (1994)


Loads of films offer a taste of British humour, but nothing quite taps into the farce of British culture as effectively as “Four Weddings and a Funeral”. Less about the eponymous events themselves and more about the tricky relationships that surround them, it’s a film packed with awkward social situations. With Hugh Grant in the leading role - and a supporting cast that includes Andie MacDowell and John Hannah, it’s funny and often exceptionally cringey to watch, with awful best man speeches and knockout ceremonies.

#6: “Kind Hearts and Coronets” (1949)


It’s not often you associate comedy with a killing spree - but that’s what this film’s all about. It stars Dennis Price as Louis Mazzini, the 10th Duke of Chalfont, who seeks revenge on the aristocratic D'Ascoyne family for disowning his mother. Vowing to claim his dukedom, he decides to bump off all those that stand in his way, including almost 10 members of the D'Ascoyne family, all amusingly played by Alec Guinness. Elaborate kills, nail-biting near misses and first-rate comic timing by Guinness, make this a must watch for any old-school comedy fan.

#5: “A Fish called Wanda” (1988)


From two of the famed Pythons, John Cleese and Michael Palin, comes a feature film about a diamond heist and the comedy of errors that follows. Written by Cleese, it’s crammed full of intelligent wordplay and varied characters, including an anglophobic Kevin Kline, stuttering Palin and flirtatious Jamie Lee Curtis. Although ridiculous throughout, it still manages to deliver an engrossing plot, and some of Cleese and Palin’s best moments on screen. But Kline steals the show, and actually won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his efforts.

#4: “The Ladykillers” (1955)


A sweet old lady and a gang of conniving criminals - an uneven match? Think again. Serial manipulator Professor Marcus, played again by Alec Guinness, needs an HQ for a robbery he's planning - so he uses the old lady's spare room. Dodging her suspicions (and her parrots) by posing as a string quintet, he embarks on an elaborate ruse which is a little darker than some other Ealing comedies, but it’s got bundles of laughs all the same. And who said it needed a remake? We certainly didn’t.

#3: “Shaun of the Dead” (2004)


We could have chosen either of the hugely successful entries in The Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy, but we’ve opted for the debut effort. Drawing on all the zombie apocalypse cliches you can think of, from holding up in a safe house to using everyday household items as weapons, “Shaun of the Dead” offers the perfect balance of satirical humour and horror. Together with snappy editing and the excellent directorial eye of Edgar Wright, it’s one of the UK's best loved films - and for very good reason.

#2: “Withnail & I” (1987)


A slightly different look at the British countryside next, with Bruce Robinson’s cult classic about two struggling actors, played by Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann. This film really is endlessly quotable, giving us an insight into the dingy, dirty and decrepit lives of two guys who are either drinking themselves stupid, getting high or generally complaining about life's injustices. Taking a trip to the countryside, they clash with the locals, kill chickens, tangle with horny bulls and meet the slightly uncouth uncle Monty.

#1: “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” (1975)


Let’s be honest, we could have easily had all three of Monty Python’s feature-length big hitters claiming the podium spots on this list, but we’ve decided to roll with the troupe’s take on the legend of King Arthur. Injecting their infectious comedy into every facet of medieval life, it plays out like a seamlessly linked chain of entertaining skits, all wrapped up in an absurd narrative. From the “she’s a witch” scene to the limbless Black Knight, it’s typical Python and it’s absolutely timeless.
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