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Top 10 Most Valuable Comic Books Of All Time

VO: Adrian Sousa WRITTEN BY: Anthony Nicoletti
Written by Anthony Nicoletti Those comics in your attic might be worth a little more than you think. Welcome to Watchmojo.com, and today, we’re counting down the Top 10 Most Valuable Comic Books. For this list, we are looking at the value of comics based on their highest recorded market value - though it’s important to note that the condition of the issue at the time it was sold played into the recorded price.
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Those comics in your attic might be worth a little more than you think. Welcome to Watchmojo.com, and today, we’re counting down the Top 10 Most Valuable Comic Books.

For this list, we are looking at the value of comics based on their highest recorded market value - though it’s important to note that the condition of the issue at the time it was sold played into the recorded price.

#10: “Captain America Comics” #1 (1941)
$343,057


This first Avenger punched his way onto the scene in 1941. The king of Patriotism can be seen on the cover of his self-titled story, giving the business to Hitler. While it could be the classic Jack Kirby cover or the fact that the Captain America property has never been more popular, but today the title fetches well into the $300,000 mark. For a title that introduced Cap into the War-torn world during WWII, the book has seen quite the inflation from its initial 10 cent price point.

#9: “Marvel Comics” #1 (1939)
$350,000


Published under Marvel Comics original name, Timely Comics, this 1939 classic saw the introduction of android superhero, Jimm Hammond, the Human Torch, and anti-hero Namor, The Sub-Mariner. The 1st printing of this book became such a smash hit, that a 2nd printing was ordered, eventually totaling over 900,000 copies in sales. Today, the book is as scarce as they come, and for a flagship, early Marvel book, the cost to own one keeps it on fire in the aftermarket. But if you want to read this landmark issue, there are many digital outlets where it’s available.

#8: “Superman” #1 (1939)
$358,500


While not the first appearance of the character, Superman’s first solo title still fetches quite the dollar tag. This 1939 classic saw the title character in all his Golden Age glory, detailing the now iconic origin of the world’s favorite Man of Steel. In this story, Superman is brought down to earth, as his alter-ego Clark Kent struggles to find an everyman job. This grail of grail books doesn’t come cheap, with a restored copy currently sitting on eBay for over $100,000 US. But for a book that helped influence generations of stories to come, can you really put a value on it?

#7: “Tales of Suspense” #39 (1963)
$375,000


In this timeless Stan Lee story, the Iron Man is born. During a military field-test, inventor Tony Stark is captured by evil tyrant Wong-Chu, and forced into making weapons, while only having days to live due to the potential of shrapnel from a landmine explosion reaching his heart. In a bid to save his life, Stark creates an iron bodysuit, with magnets to keep the shrapnel at bay. Through the years, Marvel’s B-list character has become iconic thanks in large part to Robert Downey Jr’s performance as Tony Stark, causing the price of his first appearance to continually reach new heights. If you’d like to own this hugely significant piece of literature, you probably need to be Tony Stark himself.

#6: “Flash Comics” #1 (1940)
$450,000


The fastest man alive, Jay Garrick sprinted his way onto the scene in January of 1940 in Flash Comics #1. In this classic origin story, the title character gets his super-human speed through a lab accident in which he inhales hard water vapors. Today, the Flash has seen multiple reiterations such as Barry Allen and Wally West, but the Garrick character still remains prominent in modern pop culture. Of course, a book of this nature commands a high market premium for being the first appearance and origin of a character who is still prevalent today. This golden age key also saw the first appearance of Hawkman and Johnny Thunder. Bang for your buck.

#5: “Uncanny X-Men” #1 (1963)
$492,937


The strangest superheroes of all! The X-men! This Stan Lee story accompanied by the art of the master Jack Kirby saw the origin and the first appearance of the iconic team we know today, including Professor X, Cyclops, Ice-Man, Angel, Beast, Marvel Girl AKA Jean Grey, and even Magneto. Continuing to rise in price practically daily, many collectors hold the book atop the list of best and most valuable Silver Age comics. The issue also marks the first appearance of Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters, and with the X-Men still a huge part of mainstream media, it’s hard to imagine this classic ever losing its high value.

#4: “Batman” #1 (1940)
$567,625


The Dark Knight rises in his first solo series. With Robin by his side, this truly legendary piece of literature features the first appearance of two of Batman’s biggest rogues, the Joker and Catwoman. Seeing a steady rise on the market, even copies that are brittle and worn down command the highest of premiums. The story also re-tells the well-known origin of Batman and shows young Bruce Wayne losing his parents at the hand of mugger Joe Chill. Thanks to Bill Finger and Bob Kane for this golden age masterpiece, and launching the caped vigilante into generations of fame.

#3: “Detective Comics” #27 (1939)
$1,075,000


Alright, now for the cream of the crop. Despite Detective Comics being around since 1937, it wasn’t until May of 1939 that Bruce Wayne as the Batman made his iconic first appearance. In February 2010, the book, with its classic yellow cover portraying Batman swinging onto the page, sold for a whopping $1,075,0000 at auction – a price that would even make Bruce Wayne blush. From thousands of published Batman comics to action figures and various collectibles, this book is the most sought after piece in the character’s long and storied history.

#2: “Amazing Fantasy” #15 (1962)
$1,100,000


After being bitten by a radioactive spider, average teenager Peter Parker turns into The Amazing Spider-Man, now able to climb walls and jump over cars. This first introduction to the character tells the tragic story of the death of Uncle Ben, a story comic readers around the world know by basically by heart. The book also features, what can be considered the holy trinity in comics: a Stan Lee story, with art by both Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby. Breaking the 1-million-dollar barrier in the sale of a single issue, the title remains a cornerstone of comic book history. If you do manage to find one laying around… well, Tiger, you hit the jackpot.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are some honorable mentions.

“The Incredible Hulk” #1 (1962)
$326,000

“Wonder Woman” #1 (1942)
$291,000

“The Amazing Spider-Man” #1 (1963)
$262,900

#1: “Action Comics” #1 (1938)
$3,207,852


Well, that escalated quickly. The holy grails of holy grails, Action Comics #1 to this day remains the starting point and catalyst for the superhero genre. Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel’s masterwork, through the creation of Clark Kent, The Superman, opened the world to new and exciting ways of storytelling. In 2010, two sales of the book reached the 1-million dollar pinnacle, and on August 24, 2014, a near-mint copy sold for over $3 million dollars. The baby from Krypton landed on earth to change… well, everything - launching the Golden Age of comics and changing pop culture forever.
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