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Top 10 Alan Rickman Scenes

VO: JB
Written by Sean Harris He often plays the villain, but he was one of Hollywood’s good guys. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 Alan Rickman scenes! For this list, we’ve scoured Alan Rickman’s brilliant back-catalogue, to serve up his finest scenes. We are focussing on feature films though, so no slow-mo tea-making today. An undeniably epic clip, nonetheless. Special thanks to our user WordToTheWes for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Alan Rickman Scenes


He often plays the villain, but he was one of Hollywood’s good guys. Welcome to WatchMojo UK and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 Alan Rickman scenes!

For this list, we’ve scoured Alan Rickman’s brilliant back-catalogue, to serve up his finest scenes. We are focussing on feature films though, so no slow-mo tea-making today. An undeniably epic clip, nonetheless.

#10: The Walk Out
“Michael Collins” (1996)

Though this film received some criticism for historical inaccuracies, Rickman’s role as Éamon de Valera was widely praised. In this pivotal scene, we see de Valera split from his one-time comrade Michael Collins, angered by the passing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Liam Neeson’s character takes the floor before the votes are cast, while Rickman delivers a damning response when the result goes against him. But, a fair few still follow him out the door.

#9: The Cello
“Truly, Madly, Deeply” (1990)

Alan always had a knack for playing the baddie, but romantic leads were well within his range too. This stand-out moment in a supernatural love story sees Rickman, the ghost of Juliet Stevenson’s recently departed boyfriend, flood the room with spontaneous music. He’s returned to his lover to help her get over the loss, but this rousing duet affords a final moment of shared happiness. Special mention for the moustache, too: Top marks for that top lip. All in, he truly, madly, deeply nails it.

#8: Fiery Intro
“Dogma” (1999)

A master of the misanthropic, Rickman steps out as an exasperated archangel in “Dogma”, emerging from a ball of fire inside Bethany’s bedroom. Sidestepping all the usual niceties, Alan’s character quickly drops his trousers by way of explanation, before stretching his wings for a big finish. However, confusion reigns so Rickman breezes through some biblical spiel, before whisking his subject off for shots. If there is a higher power, we really hope it’s like this.

#7: Call Off Christmas
“Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” (1991)

A BAFTA-winning turn for Rickman, his 1991 performance as the Sheriff of Nottingham was a celebration of exaggerated villainy. “Prince of Thieves” sees Alan amble through his hyperbolic role, clearly loving every minute of it. This is probably his most famous line, delivered during a fit of rage over Robin Hood’s charitable antics. The waltz from the room is what makes it, though. This is a man at the end of his tether, and he doesn’t care who knows it!

#6: By Grabthar’s Hammer…
“Galaxy Quest” (1999)

OK. So, our next entry is more an amalgamation of scenes, if only to give the catchphrase context. For 1999’s “Galaxy Quest”, Rickman plays Alexander Dane (who plays Dr. Lazarus). He’s part of the cast for a cult sci-fi show, who find themselves battling real life aliens as the movie progresses. Still with us? A running gag plays on how much Rickman’s character despises his own catchphrase. But then Quellek gets shot and he delivers it for real. What a way to go.

#5: Ensnare the Senses
“Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” (2001)

Harry’s first Potions class is a clear highlight in the opening Potter film, with Rickman’s Professor Snape igniting a series-long rivalry. The theatrical release sees Snape sneer through a poetic introduction, before blitzing Harry with unanswerable questions – all while Hermione strives desperately to be seen. The extended version builds on the tension, as Harry tries to hit back. Setting the tone for the saga which follows, it’s a scene stacked with memorably magic lines.

#4: A Classic Fool
“Love Actually” (2003)

Starring opposite Emma Thompson, Alan plays one half of a key storyline in “Love Actually”. As Harry, he’s a married man with children, but then his head’s turned by a woman from work. One thing leads to another, and Rowan Atkinson almost blows his cover. But here’s where the fling unravels, for a moment fraught with emotion. For Rickman’s character, the realisation is instant; he’s been an idiot, and he knows it. But can their relationship recover?

#3: The Judge’s Death
“Sweeney Todd: Demon Barber of Fleet Street” (2008)

Under Tim Burton’s directorship, Rickman plays Judge Turpin, the corrupt court official at the centre of Sweeney Todd’s grisly revenge mission. Not realising that his barber is actually Benjamin Barker, who he’d previously convicted so as to steal his wife, the Judge takes the chair for two critical scenes. He survives his first singalong shave, but the inevitable bloodbath happens eventually. Rickman tries a melodic reprise, but Todd gets gory and cuts him short.

#2: Hans Gruber’s Death
“Die Hard” (1988)

The role which announced Rickman to worldwide audiences, Hans Gruber is surely one of cinema’s greatest ever villains. A cold, clever and ruthless criminal mastermind, he sure knows how to ruin a Christmas party. But his final moments are probably his most famous. First, he steals McLane’s line like the brilliant badass he is, then he almost pulls John’s estranged wife from a top floor window. But one fumbled watch-strap later, and it’s sayonara in slow-motion.

#1: Snape’s Final Memories
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2” (2011)

We’ve already seen that Snape was an intimidating sort, but today’s top spot reveals the true hero within. Disposed of by the Dark Lord, who sought supreme control of the Elder Wand, Snape breathes his last and instructs Harry to take his parting tears to the Pensieve. And everything fits into place. It’s not especially good news for Harry himself, but it does prove where Snape’s ever-questionable loyalties had lain. He was Dumbledore’s man all along.
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