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Top 10 Awkward Baby Names

VO: Rebecca Brayton
Script written by George Cimurt. Sometimes ridiculous, sometimes illegal, sometimes offensive, but all of them weird. Join WatchMojo.com as we count down our picks for the top 10 awkward baby names. For this list, we’re choosing monikers that real people have named – or at least attempted to name – their babies. As mentioned, they can either be offensive, strange, have negative connotations, and in some cases they can even be banned in certain countries – our definition of awkward in this case is pretty broad. Special thanks to our users Mattyhull1, Lindsey Daggett, Seston, Mati, adrianloveslucius and katiekongsdorf for submitting the idea on our Suggestions Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Transcript
Script written by George Cimurt.

Top 10 Awkward Baby Names


Sometimes ridiculous, sometimes illegal, sometimes offensive, but all of them weird. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 awkward baby names.

For this list, we’re choosing monikers that real people have named – or at least attempted to name – their babies. As mentioned, they can either be offensive, strange, have negative connotations, and in some cases they can even be banned in certain countries – our definition of awkward in this case is pretty broad. And be sure to check out the rest of our awkward series!

#10: 4Real
Banned in: New Zealand

In 2007, Pat and Sheena Wheaton of New Zealand were filled with amazement after seeing a picture of their developing baby on an ultrasound, finally grasping that they were going to be parents “for real.” Needless to say, they tried to register their newborn son with the name 4 – as in the number four – real, one word, but it was forbidden and subsequently banned by the government because of its use of a number, along with over 70 other names that were deemed too unusual or distasteful. The Wheatons then settled on the only-slightly-less-strange name: Superman.

#9: 007
Banned in: Malaysia

Fictional spy James Bond has scores of fans, but few of us would decide to try to name our baby after the agent’s three-digit code number. Apparently, someone tried in Malaysia, but it was then banned after the National Registration Department – much like New Zealand’s similar organization – decided you could not name your child a number. After consulting with numerous religious groups, they came up with a definitive list of unsuitable titles that includes the names of animals, insects, fruit, vegetables, colors and Japanese cars. So get creative, but not too creative.

#8: Anus
Banned in: Denmark

Referring to the external opening at the bottom of the rectum, this word is among the names that parents actually tried to bestow upon their children in Denmark, but were consequently (and fortunately) rejected. With so many Danes apparently trying to give their kids such weird titles, the government came up with around 7,000 sanctioned names that parents can choose from, as long as the handle is gender appropriate. To deviate from the list, even just to change the spelling a bit or to add an ethnic flavor, you need special governmental approval and even then you probably won’t get permission.

#7: @
Banned in: China

Oh yes, somebody tried it. Although details of rejected names are not often published, this one must’ve been too crazy to be suppressed. Probably because the symbol – when read aloud in Chinese – sounds like the phrase “love him,” one couple submitted it to the police, who have control over name approval since they hand out the country’s ID cards. It didn’t take long for the name to come back as a “nope,” especially as the government has recommended giving babies names that are easily readable and, obviously, not bizarre. We’re predicting the next one’s gonna be “#.”

#6: Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116
Banned in: Sweden

Reportedly pronounced Albin, a Swedish couple decided to name their child this in defiance of what they saw as Sweden’s severe laws on naming conventions. The parents failed to officially name their child before he turned five, and were subsequently fined. Their form of artistic protest was this 43-character name, which was – of course – denied, as was their next effort: “A” – also pronounced Albin. Although it’s unknown how they came up with the gibberish series of letters and numbers, what’s certain is that if you name your child anything from IKEA to Q to Metallica in this country, you might be fined.

#5: Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii
Banned in: New Zealand

You gotta love, or hate, the parents that came up with this one. This wasn’t a name that was banned after her parents tried to name her at birth, oh no; the poor girl had this name for 9 years before a judge made her a ward of the court and had her name changed during a custody battle, when it was discovered that she had told schoolmates that her name was “K” to avoid embarrassment. Ironically, a few names New Zealand let slide were Midnight Chardonnay and Number 16 Bus Shelter.

#4: Osama bin Laden
Banned in: Germany

Germany’s laws regarding names specify that if a name is chosen after a product, or is degrading, absurd, or does not indicate the child’s gender, it is forbidden. Thus, when a Turkish couple in Cologne associated with a group of radicals led by a convicted imam tried to name their child after the infamous terrorist leader less than a year after the events of 9/11, they were told no. Why they’ve banned names like Anderson, however, we’ll never understand.

#3: Judas
Not Banned

Although currently not on any lists of forbidden names, this name has long been controversial, as it belongs to one of the Bible’s most infamous men, one of the original 12 apostles of Jesus Christ and the one who betrayed him for 30 pieces of silver. Although controversial Bible names like Judas, Cain and Delilah are becoming more commonplace, they’re still rare; in a recent study in the United States, while over 2,000 boys were called Jude and over 1,000 called Judah, just 13 tykes in the whole country were named Judas.

#2: Lucifer
Banned in: New Zealand

Although the name sounds appealing enough for at least half a dozen couples to try to use it as their child’s name, and it comes from a root word meaning “shining one” or “morning star,” Lucifer’s origins are simply devilish. Therefore, this name, which is included in the Old Testament of the Bible as a reference to Satan, is not surprisingly banned in New Zealand. Along with this devilish moniker, New Zealand has also banned words like Messiah, King, and Duke from entering the country’s register, in addition to other names that resemble ranks, titles, or are awkwardly long.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:

- Jihad

Not Banned

- Akuma [meaning “Devil”]

Banned: in Japan

- Chow Tow [meaning “Smelly Head”]

Banned in: Malaysia

- Dick

Not Banned


#1: Adolf
Not Banned

When a local supermarket refused to decorate Heath Campbell’s son’s birthday cake with his first two given names, Campbell was outraged. His son’s given names? You guessed it, Adolf Hitler. While the name Adolf is actually not banned and is quite popular in some regions, the full name Adolf Hitler has been banned in multiple countries, from New Zealand to Mexico to Germany. Even if it’s not illegal in your country, naming your child after one of the most infamous and murderous dictators of all time? Maybe not such a good idea.

Do you agree with our list? Which names are you glad your parents didn’t give you? For more entertaining top 10s published every day, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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