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Top 10 Biggest Mistakes in Artemis Fowl

apologies in advanced for spoilers
we will be using very common media to movie adaptation mistakes that are also found in other movies, including Percy Jackson
After the disappointing debut in the movie, we are looking at the biggest mistakes inside and out of the entire movie adaptation.
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    1short run time
    we were originally expected the movie to be at least 2 hours, minus the credit roll. However, it was chopped down to nearly 90 minutes due to rush production.
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  • 2making the main character generically bland
    In the book, Artemis's sick mother is a crucial anchor to his humanity, as he must balance his criminal scheming with caring for her. But in the Movie, Disney goes for the missing mom approach with Angeline fowl being deceased.
    changing the main character's traits resulting in grand consequences.
    Book Artemis is unathletic, as physically incompetent as he is mentally profound. The movie Artemis, meanwhile, spends his free time surfing and wields weapons with aplomb.
  • 3removing Pesky 'themes' and complicated morals
    Either way, Artemis Fowl immediately joins such theme-squandering examples as the Ender's Game movie, which sacrificed much of the book's empathetic message in search of a kinetic space romp, and the Golden Compass movie, which removed much of the book's religious criticism for fear of offending viewers.
    but the Adaptation, on a journey which might be the opposite to the books.
    Artemis gathering a sense of morality across the books.
    In book form, he stood out amid a sea of similarly styled main characters because he forced young readers to navigate an unfamiliar archetype and understand shades of gray.
    Artemis also kidnaps Holly in the film, yet by casting this decision as the only possible first step to rescue his father, the movie removes the moral ambiguities around the character.
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  • 4making it too child-friendly
    Disney was reluctant to sully its 'squeaky clean, family friendly' reputation
    Unlike Liongates' Hunger Games series and Warner Bros.' Harry Potter Films, Disney felt rather hesitant when it comes to adapting a young adult book into a film.
    Artemis fowl's book series caters to young adults. However, the second Disney got the rights to film Artemis Fowl, the film crew completely rewrite the story to cater the company's usual target audience, children.
  • 5changing all side characters' most prominent characteristics
    Force Judi Dench to dress in an elf costume and bitterly recite the most Irish line possible
    Suffice it to say, neither of these traits%u2014physical or mental%u2014comes from the book, and seemingly exist in the movie for the sake of a single Gad punch line.
    Elsewhere, dwarf criminal Mulch Diggums, played by Josh Gad, is a riotously fun sidekick, but for some reason, Branagh's version turns him into a 'giant dwarf' obsessed with his size.
    Normally, gender-swapping characters is a perfectly reasonable adaptive choice. But here, it undercuts a key element of Holly's complicated character. She's also described in the books with "nut-brown skin," but presents as white in the movie.
    n the movie, conversely, Holly is wholly motivated by her dead father%u2014a character never mentioned in the books. At the same time, the glass ceiling subplot is removed because Branagh built an egalitarian police force, led by Judi Dench as the gender-swapped police captain.
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  • 6force the characters into a friendship
    In the movie, conversely, they develop trust after a single conversation because their fathers, one wildly different from his book series portrayal, one invented for the movie, were allies. It certainly seems easier to just tell the audience that two characters are friends, instead of actually showing that progression over time.
    This reaction makes sense, she'd been kidnapped and held for ransom, and would no doubt feel bitterly toward her captor. It takes multiple books and plenty of side-by-side adventuring for the two to forge a grudging respect, then a genuine friendship.
    Holly ends the first book with a "big ball of hatred" directed Artemis's way, thinking that the next time she saw him, she'd greet him "with a big gun and a smile."
  • 7Ignored the plot that's prove to please the audience
    that decision was perhaps most glaring in Artemis Fowl, both because that sensation of jumping around jumbled the various character motivations in addition to the plots and because the book plot should have worked perfectly well as a movie without any meddling. Audiences adore Die Hard, and audiences adore magic, and audiences adore heist stories%u
    So, the Aculos? The crucial MacGuffin central to fairy society, with unexplained yet seemingly unlimited power? Yeah, that doesn't exist in the books. It'd be like if Peter Jackson had invented the One Ring for Frodo to carry, instead of taking it from J.R.R. Tolkien's world.
    Overall, the movie splices together parts of the first book (like Holly's abduction and multiple battles with a troll), parts of the second book (like the father's kidnapping and Artemis's chat with a psychiatrist), and other newly invented parts, all to create a new confusing timeline.
    When it comes to His Dark Materials and Percy Jackson movies, this proves that Artemis Fowl is the 3rd among the adaptations resulting in an appalling performance once again.
  • 8Don't explain any of the magic
    Artemis Fowl is no different. The book climaxes with the "coup de grace" to Artemis's grand criminal conspiracy, which involves feints and double bluffs and receives plenty of clever foreshadowing throughout the story. The movie instead climaxes with an explosion that seems certain to kill Artemis, yet amid all the chaos and difficul
    This is a tried-and-true trick for many YA adaptations, from Alex Rider and Eragon to The Giver and even outrageously successful movies, like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2. Creators figure that climaxes that work on the page don't contain enough action and add their own CGI spectacles to liven up the proceedings, even if the tan
    This part of the story is scarcely explained, though, as Branagh rushes through the plot to meet an 89-minute run time (not counting end credits). This lack of attention to world-building can't help but confuse new viewers while disappointing longtime fans.
    And the creatures' magic is tied to nature%u2014especially as the series continues, the books carry a strong environmental message%u2014and born from Irish myth, giving it a unique flavor amid the magical YA landscape.
    he fairy world in Artemis Fowl features a fascinating mix of magic and technology. The first book, for instance, explains how one type of magic previously performed by a team of warlocks was transferred to lithium batteries as fairy society adapted to modern times.
  • 9change almost everything about the ending
    The movie instead climaxes with an explosion that seems certain to kill Artemis, yet amid all the chaos and difficult-to-track action, somehow, he escapes destruction. It's unclear how and it's unclear why, but it happens. And isn't that fun?
    Artemis Fowl is no different. The book climaxes with the "coup de grace" to Artemis's grand criminal conspiracy, which involves feints and double bluffs and receives plenty of clever foreshadowing throughout the story.
    Creators figure that climaxes that work on the page don't contain enough action and add their own CGI spectacles to liven up the proceedings, even if the tangible result of their changes are greater mess rather than added excitement.
    This is a tried-and-true trick for many YA adaptations, from Alex Rider and Eragon to The Giver and even outrageously successful movies, like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.
  • 10removing Hong Chau's character and entire scene from the final cut
    the film would've further portray Artemis Fowl's villainous nature by poisoning a water sprite, Hong Chau's character, in return for the book.
    Chau's actual role was in a scene that was particularly faithful to the books, which is why it's so unfortunate that it was cut.
  • 11set up a sequel that won't ever exist
    The Divergent series, most galling of all, planned four movies but produced only three before stopping short of the conclusion.
    Artemis also likely motors off into the great void of unfulfilled sequel promises, however. The Golden Compass teased a sequel that never came. Ditto Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters and Eragon and Alex Rider and so many more
    It's that kind of movie, unwilling to let a single clichd rock go unturned.
    After that improbable survival, the movie ends with Artemis calling Opal Koboi, the faceless villain who had abducted his father, and warning he'd take her down; triumphant music soaring, he climbs aboard a helicopter with Mulch and his father, Holly flying alongside, and motors off into the sunset. It's that kind of movie, unwilling to l
    The future of the Artemis Fowl Cinematic Universe is still to be determined, but if the early reception, a Rotten Tomatoes score of 10 percent from critics and 23 percent from audiences, as of Sunday night, is any indication, Artemis's onscreen battle with Opal will remain forever unexplored
  • 12unwarranted plot devices in the movie
    The aculos has little to no value in the movie adaptation.

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