Steven Spielberg: His Career from Jaws To Tintin

He is the most commercially successful filmmaker in Hollywood. Having spent his youth creating 8mm films, at only 13 years old he had already won a prize for his forty-minute amateur war film. Later, he became an unpaid, seven-days-a-week intern and guest in the editing department at Universal Studios. There, he made his short 1968 theatrical film ‘Amblin,’ which gained instant recognition and made him the youngest director ever signed for a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio. Directing various television programs and features, such as 1971’s “Duel”, he went on to helm the iconic horror-thriller “Jaws.” Since then he has created such classics as “Close Encounters of The Third Kind,” "Indiana Jones", “E.T. The Extra Terrestrial” and "Jurassic Park", which have each become many of the top grossing films of all time. In this video, WatchMojo.com takes a look at the career of director Steven Spielberg.
Credits
Tags
Comments

You must login to access this feature

Transcript
Steven Spielberg: His Career from Jaws To Tintin

He is the most commercially successful filmmaker in Hollywood. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be taking a look at the directorial career of Steven Spielberg.

Born December 18th, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio, he was raised in New Jersey and Arizona. There, he spend his youth creating 8mm films with his friends, and at only 13 years old he had already won a prize for his forty-minute amateur war film “Escape To Nowhere”, based on the battle of East Africa.

He later attended California State University, and became an unpaid, seven-days-a-week intern and guest in the editing department at Universal Studios.

There, he made his short 1968 theatrical film ‘Amblin,’ which was seen by the vice-president of Universal’s television unit. Loving the film, Spielberg was made the youngest director ever signed for a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio.

As a result, he decided to drop out of school to direct various television projects. Universal’s satisfaction with his work quickly led to him directing a series of made-for-television features, beginning with 1971’s “Duel”, a film about a psychotic trucker who chases a terrified driver.

Following this, Spielberg’s debut theatrical film was 1974’s “The Sugarland Express”, which followed the story of a married couple who are chased by police as they try and regain custody of their baby. Praised by critics, the film unfortunately flopped at the box-office.

Undiscouraged, the young director took on the horror-thriller “Jaws.” The grueling project was plagued by delays and budget over-runs, but it went on to become an enormous hit earning nearly half a billion dollars worldwide, and winnig three Academy Awards.

Having earned his mainstream breakthrough, he promptly rejected offers to direct its sequel and instead helmed his sci-fi masterpiece “Close Encounters of The Third Kind,” which earned six Academy Awards.

Next, Spielberg teamed with his longtime friend, Star Wars creator George Lucas, to bring the archeologist-adventurer Indiana Jones to life in not one, but several widely popular installments.

Meanwhile, Spielberg returned to science fiction in 1981 with his iconic tale of a young boy who befriends an alien in “E.T. The Extra Terrestrial,” which become one of the top grossing films of all time.

The director then delved into drama with “The Color Purple” and “Empire of The Sun”, before releasing his Peter-Pan sequel “Hook.” But it was his 1993 adaptation of Michael Crichton’s dinosaur novel “Jurassic Park” that would become the most successful, generating nearly a billion dollars at the box office.

Following this, Spielberg earned his first Academy Award for “Schindler’s List”, a deeply emotional true story of a German who risked everything to save the lives of 1100 Jews during the Holocaust.

Afterward, he took a short hiatus from directing to build-up DreamWorks in 1994, that would co-exist with his original production studio Amblin Entertainment, which he had opened back in 1981. Rounding out the 90s, he tackled the Jurassic Park sequel “The Lost World,” “Amistad” and his gritty war epic “Saving Private Ryan.”

At the turn of the millennium, the director completed Stanley Kurick’s final project “A.I. Artificial Intelligence,” helmed the futuristic action flick “Minority Report,” told the story of a young con artist in “Catch Me If You Can,” crafted his modern adaptation of “War of The Worlds,” and dramatized the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in “Munich.”

Finally granting the wishes of long-time fans, he re-teamed with George Lucas in 2008 to bring back his fedora-clad hero back to the silver screen in “Indiana Jones And The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,” before beginning work on creating a trilogy based on The Adventures of Tin Tin, and his World War One epic “War Horse.”

With a career spanning over 40 years, Spielberg has directed many of the most revered and influential films in the history of cinema, and continues to be one of the most respected visionaries in Hollywood today.
Download

You must register to a corporate account to download. Please login

Related Videos

+ see more

More