Top 10 Olivia Colman Moments as Queen Elizabeth II

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Top 10 Olivia Colman Moments as Queen Elizabeth II

VOICE OVER: Emily Brayton WRITTEN BY: Tal Fox
These Olivia Colman moments as Queen Elizabeth II were all Emmy-worthy. Our countdown includes choosing her favorite child, a life with horses, the final visit to the Duke of Windsor, and more!
Transcript

Top 10 Olivia Colman Moments as Queen Elizebeth II


Welcome to MsMojo, and today we’re counting down our picks for the Top 10 Olivia Colman Moments as Queen Elizabeth II

For this list, we’ll be looking at times this award-winning actress gave an unforgettable performance as the British Monarch in seasons 3 and 4 of “The Crown.”

Which of her scenes did you think was most regal? Let one know in the comments.

#10: The Queen Gets Caught Between Charles & Diana
“War”


Most mothers wouldn’t want to see their child suffer in an unhappy marriage, but this Queen isn’t most mothers. Feeling constantly assailed by Charles and Diana’s marital woes (xref), she decides that enough is enough. When Charles brings up his troubled relationship, she reminds him of his privilege and how they all know that he’s hardly the victim in his marital problems. It’s not often that we see the Queen lose her temper like this but, Colman gives a very compelling performance that has us agreeing with her every word. Yet, in the battle between the crown and her family’s happiness, the crown wins again.

#9: Queen Elizabeth vs. Margaret Thatcher
“48:1”


In this season four episode, Thatcher gets the Queen so riled up that she breaks protocol and offers an opinion. If you know your British politics, then you’ll know that the Head of State is forbidden from speaking out on political matters. Yet this is one issue that the Queen uncharacteristically refuses to back down on. The pair already don’t see eye-to-eye on matters regarding the Commonwealth. Thatcher’s reluctance to impose sanctions on apartheid South Africa only deepens their friction. The battle that ensues between the pair is played rather lightheartedly with plenty of creative licensing. Still, we’re rooting for Queen Elizabeth to win.

#8: Showing Kindness to an Intruder
“Fagan”


By now you’re probably aware that this episode is rooted in true events. Although, it seems rather unlikely that the Queen sat and chatted with the man who broke into her bedroom. However, what we like about “The Crown’s” version of events is that it shows the monarch’s humility. Rather than dismiss a man who’s quite clearly in distress, she sits and listens to his concerns. Admittedly, in her eyes, it was probably the safest option given the circumstances. Nevertheless, as they part ways, the Queen lets him know that he has been heard, which is really all he wanted all along.

#7: Choosing Her Favorite Child
“Favourites”


How many parents would actually admit to having a favorite child? Well according to “The Crown,” Prince Philip and Margaret Thatcher. With that in mind, Elizabeth decides to investigate whether she too has a favorite. It’s quite amusing to see the Queen step into the mother role from offering unwanted home renovation advice to asking about school. Yet, her conversations also highlight how disengaged she is from her children’s lives. Bizarrely and, of course, controversially, she concludes that Andrew is her favorite. But don’t worry, according to the Queen’s cousin, Lady Patricia Mountbatten, like most of this episode, that’s fabricated too.

#6: A Tender Moment Between Sisters
“Cri de Coeur”


One theme that runs throughout the series is the perpetual power struggle between family and duty. In fact, it’s that clash that led to this heartwarming scene between sisters. Elizabeth visits Margaret, who’s going through a rough time, and professes just how much her sister means to her. As we’ll see later, the Queen often struggles to engage with her emotions, so we don’t often get a glimpse of her vulnerable side. We’re reaching for the tissues just watching her eyes fill up with tears. Despite the belief that the crown must always come first, at heart Elizabeth knows that nothing’s more important than family.

#5: Putting Prince Charles in His Place
“Tywysog Cymru”


After spending some time in Wales and connecting with the people, Charles alters his investiture speech to reflect the values they deem most important. It’s very moving...only, the Queen doesn’t approve of him going off script, leading to a simmering confrontation later that night. Elizabeth and Charles’ relationship is often portrayed as strained and nothing shows that more than this argument. Actor Josh O’Connor said that Colman is such a warm person so “when she plays cold, it’s kind of shocking. It’s quite alarming.” Indeed we were all shocked, especially when she tells her own son that no one cares about what he thinks.

#4: A Life With Horses
“Coup”


Throughout the series, Elizabeth’s love of horses is referenced on numerous occasions. In this scene from season three, she talks about her fondness for the animal in a poignant moment of self-reflection. She wistfully imagines how different her life might have been had her uncle had never abdicated. They say that the eyes are the window to the soul and Colman is so talented that even if the words lack emotion, her eyes say it all. We can all relate to that “What if?” moment too and, we’re reminded that behind the smoke and mirrors is a person who just wants to be happy.

#3: The Final Visit to the Duke of Windsor
“Dangling Man”


Speaking of the Queen’s uncle, in season three, upon learning that he’s gravely ill, she decides to visit him. He admits that he was wrong about her in this important moment of reconciliation between uncle and niece. It even becomes an opportunity for him to offer his insight one final time. Not only does Elizabeth accept his apology but also reveals that ultimately he gave her some cause to be grateful. Everything she says is clearly spoken from the heart and you can feel the animosity of the past all but drift away. Shortly after this satisfying resolve though, the Duke of Windsor passes away. Despite everything that happened prior, their final exchange leaves us all choked up.

#2: Her Delayed Response to the Aberfan Disaster
“Aberfan”


Unlike Olivia Colman, the Queen isn’t one for outward displays of emotion. In fact, the crew had to come up with some tricks to prevent the actress from crying during more emotional scenes. Following a disastrous coal slide, The Queen makes a belated visit to the grief-stricken village of Aberfan. Later in a moment of painful self-awareness, she reflects upon how she was able to go through the motions, without showing an ounce of emotion. It’s only when she sits alone, listening to the hymn from the funeral, that she finally sheds some tears. Indeed, her delayed response to the Aberfan disaster reportedly remains one of her greatest regrets.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions.

Why She Won’t Perform for Her Husband, “Avalanche”
Don’t Mess With This Queen

This Uptown Girl Gets a Lesson in Popular Culture, “Avalanche”
We Guess She’s Never Heard This Backstreet Guy

Don’t Push Queen Elizabeth’s Button, “The Hereditary Principle”
One Must Refrain from Ringing the Queen’s Bell

When Thatcher Gets a Lesson in Hunting 101, “The Balmoral Test”
We Don’t Condone Hunting, but That’s Some Sound Advice

The Queen Likes a Good Poem, “Margaretology”
But We’re Thinking That Margaret’s Dirty Limerick May Not Be to Her Taste

#1: Elizabeth Confronts Anthony Blunt
“Olding”


Season three begins with the shocking revelation that there’s a spy in Buckingham Palace. Eventually the Queen’s art advisor, Anthony Blunt is uncovered as a mole for the Soviet Union. The way that she handles the betrayal is impressive and quite admirable. Not necessarily how she lets it slide to save face, but more the sly way in which she issues a veiled message to the art historian. With all the grace and decorum of a Queen, she lets him know exactly what she thinks of him. Her performance is remarkable and no one knows how to throw shade quite like Olivia Colman’s Queen Elizabeth.
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