Discover Berlin's Religious Sites

One stunning example of religious architecture in Berlin is the Berlin Cathedral. Known as the Protestant 'St. Peter’s Basilica' the current building is the largest Protestant church in Europe. Another example is the New Synagogue which, like the majority of Berlin’s historical buildings, was destroyed in the mid-twentieth century. The original building of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Memorial Church was damaged during the War in 1943. A new building was later constructed in stark contrast to the old church, and stands today as both a place of worship and as a war memorial. In this video, WatchMojo.com takes a look at the most striking examples of religious architecture in Berlin, Germany.
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Found on Museum Island, the Berlin Cathedral is over a century old. The history of this site, however, dates back to the Middle Ages. It has been rebuilt several times, the latest incarnation being more modest than its predecessor. The Berlin Cathedral is known as the Protestant "St. Peter’s Basilica." In fact, the current building is the largest Protestant church in Europe. The interior of the church is ornately decorated and magnificent, which is more typical of a Catholic church. Possibly the most striking element of the building is its domed roof. However, the pulpit, main altar and stained glass windows are remarkable as well.

As with the majority of Berlin’s historical buildings, the New Synagogue was destroyed in the mid-twentieth century. While it is no longer a place of worship, the synagogue has been restored to its former glory and houses a museum honoring the Jewish people. This building also boasts a magnificent dome, which has been described as one of the most spectacular in Berlin. When it was built between 1859 and 1866, it was the biggest synagogue in Germany, seating three thousand.

The Kaiser-Wilhelm Memorial Church was originally built during the last decade of the nineteenth century. However only a spire and the entrance hall remain of that building, as the structure was damaged by a bombing raid in 1943. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, a new building was constructed in stark contrast to the old church. Made of stained glass inlays, concrete and steel, this more modern hexagonal tower lends an element of drama to the landmark. Together, the two buildings stand both as a place of worship and as a war memorial.

With such a storied history, it is easy to see why the religious attractions in Berlin are so breathtaking.
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