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Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Glass

VO: Rebecca Brayton WRITTEN BY: Owen Maxwell

The final installment of M. Night Shyamalan’s Eastrail 177 Trilogy, “Glass” packs more than a few surprises! The threequel unites Samuel L. Jackson’s Elijah Price and Bruce Willis’ David Dunn from “Unbreakable” with James McAvoy’s Kevin Crumb (aka The Horde) from “Split” in a comic book movie with a difference. Check out these clues, cameos, Easter Eggs, and behind-the-scenes trivia from “Glass”! What was YOUR favorite moment in the movie? Let us know in the comments!

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Script written by Owen Maxwell

Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Glass


After 19 years, M. Night Shyamalan still has us mesmerized. Welcome to WatchMojo, and today we're counting down our picks for the Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Glass.

For this list, we'll be looking at the most fascinating details and Easter eggs relating to M. Night Shyamalan's “Glass”. We'll be touching on plot elements from ‘Glass’. ‘Split’, and ‘Unbreakable’ so consider this a spoiler alert!

#10: It’s Filled with Comic Book References

As 'Glass' tries to redefine the superhero genre, it also pays plenty of respect to comics as a whole. Mr. Glass also talks about creating Dunn's superhero persona, much like how Joe Chill inadvertently created Batman. All the superhumans have unusual weaknesses too, with Dunn experiencing water like it's Kryptonite, and Kevin's vulnerability to his name recalling Mr. Mxyzptlk. Several fans have also compared Mr. Glass's awakening to 'The Dark Knight Returns,' when a comatose Joker returns to crime after hearing Batman's name. Along with dozens of on-screen comics and references to DC and Marvel, 'Glass' honors its roots without being obvious about it.

#9: It Was Shot in a Real Psychiatric Hospital

Rather than building a set in a studio, “Glass” filmed in an actual psychiatric institution to establish their look. For Dr. Staple's evaluations, M. Night Shyamalan used the Allentown State Hospital in Pennsylvania. The building had been closed back in 2010, though it looked state of the art within the movie. Allentown locals were hired as extras. Shyamalan grew up in Pennsylvania himself, and had previously filmed scenes for “Signs” and “The Sixth Sense” in nearby counties. Given that much of the film took place in a hospital, it helped that the crew used an authentic location.

#8: Shyamalan Considers It to Be the "First Truly Grounded Comic Book Movie"

In his announcement panel for “Glass” at Comic-Con, M. Night Shyamalan made the bold claim that it would be the first really grounded comic book film. “Glass” gives its heroes and villains only moderately impressive abilities, like enhanced strength, intelligence, and climbing skills. In fact, the relative mundaneness of these powers leads the movie’s characters to question whether they’re really superhuman at all. Shyamalan stated that this was part of his overall style, where the supernatural starts to feel almost rational. As a realistic take on powers, vigilantism, and violence, “Glass” explored comics in a way few have tried before.

#7: The 24 Personalities

On top of his animal-like abilities as The Beast, Kevin Wendell Crumb is best known for the numerous personalities who inhabit his mind. In “Split” we met the childlike Hedwig, the level-headed Barry, the callous and perverted Dennis, and the polite but malevolent Patricia. We also glimpsed Jade and Orwell. But in “Glass”, we get to see 20 out of the 24 personalities that crowd Kevin’s head. This is possible thanks to lights in his room that force him to switch personalities. Keep a lookout and you’ll notice that the room also has a large collection of toothbrushes for each personality.

#6: M. Night Shyamalan Appears in All Three Movies

Shyamalan's appearance in “Glass” was not a one-off affair, since he also showed up in “Unbreakable” and “Split”. While each cameo seemed innocent individually, “Glass” established M. Night as the same character in all three films. In “Unbreakable”, Shyamalan portrayed a druggie whom Dunn confronts at a sporting event. For “Split”, he played Jai, a landlord with some messy habits. “Glass” sees Jai walk into Dunn's new security shop and recognize him on the spot. Jai even talked about his shady past, before he discussed his dead tenant from the events of “Split”. By turning these small cameos into a subtle character arc, Shyamalan brought more intrigue to the trilogy as a whole.

#5: The Movie Was Originally Supposed to Be Over Three Hours Longv
Since it’d been 19 years between the release of “Glass” and “Unbreakable”, M. Night Shyamalan wanted to recap his story. This meant “Glass” originally had several scenes that reminded the audience of past events and explained the details of Kevin's personalities. Before this material was cut from the movie, the original run-time spanned three hours and twenty minutes. Shyamalan mentioned an extended flashback for Kevin and the Horde as well, but he eventually felt that their introduction through Patricia worked just as well. After Shyamalan removed all the exposition, the two hours and nine minutes we were left with worked well.


#4: James McAvoy Based One of Kevin’s Personalities on Saoirse Ronan

Each of Kevin's personalities grew from defining characteristics that James McAvoy built on over time. One of these people however, was inspired by a twelve-year-old Saoirse Ronan. McAvoy specifically focused on Ronan's character in 2007's “Atonement”, in which they co-starred. The Horde personality was framed around Saoirse's lively cadence when speaking, rather than her accent. Though James never named the specific personality that Ronan inspired, he did say it was “one of the twins”. While adapting Ronan was certainly a strange choice, it gave fans another detail to obsess over on repeat viewings.

#3: Each Character's Color Symbolizes Something

“Glass” gave each of its characters a unique look. through character specific lighting and wardrobe colors, but they were more than just visual flair. Mr. Glass wore lots of purple due to its royal associations, since Glass saw himself as a genius leader. Dunn on the other hand was filmed with plenty of green, for its life-giving connotations. Yellow tones were used for the Horde based on their use in various Eastern religious traditions. This was due to the Beast's saviour complex, as he sought to save the broken. As great as the different hues were as a stylistic choice, they also helped Shyamalan give more depth to his characters.

#2: "Glass" Features Footage Shot for "Unbreakable"

“Unbreakable’s” deleted scenes weren't wasted. The old footage was recycled into “Glass”, in order to flash back to a younger David Dunn and his son Joseph. Their conversation, in which Joseph reveals that he’s discovered his father’s secret identity, foreshadows Joseph’s sidekick role at the start of “Glass”. By recycling the footage, Shyamalan saved himself extra filming, and also avoided the hit-and-miss results of de-aging and re-casting characters in flashbacks. Given the massive time gap between “Unbreakable” in “Glass”, he must have been pretty happy he hung onto it.
Source: https://comicbook.com/horror/2019/01/18/glass-movie-unbreakable-deleted-scene-bruce-willis/ - explaining one scene
Source: https://movieweb.com/glass-movie-unbreakable-deleted-scenes/ - there weren't deleted scene in the original DVD (allegedly), ended up using unused scenes,

#1: It's A Trilogy 19 Years In The Making

Between “Unbreakable”, “Split”, and “Glass”, the Eastrail 177 Trilogy has been 19 years in the making. Although “Split” was marketed as a standalone film, it was revealed to be a sequel in its final moments. He was originally supposed to be part of “Unbreakable” too - with one scene showing Dunn bumping into the Horde at a train station, and hearing chaotic voices. Executives and even James McAvoy himself weren't aware that “Split” was a sequel until later in its production. Shyamalan has suggested that “Unbreakable” was always part of a trilogy, but that studios didn't want more hero films at the time. Despite a long wait for the stars to align, M. Night finally got to make the trilogy he wanted.
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