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Top 10 Weirdest British Music Videos

VO: Richard Bush
Written by Andrea Buccino Expect the unexpected. Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 10 weirdest British music videos. For this list, we’re paying homage to the strangest and most surreal music videos from British bands and artists. By chance or design, these videos truly stand out from the crowd. And whether they’re clever, creative or just plain confusing, they’ve earned their own unique spot in music history. Special thanks to our user WordToTheWes for submitting the idea on our interactive suggestion tool: WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Top 10 Weirdest British Music Videos


Expect the unexpected. Welcome to WatchMojo UK, and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the Top 10 weirdest British music videos.

For this list, we’re paying homage to the strangest and most surreal music videos from British bands and artists. By chance or design, these videos truly stand out from the crowd. And whether they’re clever, creative or just plain confusing, they’ve earned their own unique spot in music history.

#10: “Wuthering Heights” (1978)
Kate Bush

Kate Bush’s debut single does not need much of an introduction. Inspired by the classic Emily Brontë novel, “Wuthering Heights” propelled the young singer-songwriter to the top of the UK Singles Chart in 1978. And what better way to celebrate than by floating through the trees? This US version music video is made up completely of Kate Bush eerily gliding across the screen, showing off her now-signature style. Of course, there is another version, but it’s more of the same. It’s magical, mesmerising and mystifying all at once.

#9: “What’s a Girl to Do?” (2006)
Bat for Lashes

If you’ve ever seen “Donnie Darko”, this next entry might bring back some memories. And anything reminiscent of that film is bound to be a bit weird, right? Nominated for various music video of the year awards, the unconventional accompaniment to Bat for Lashes’ “What’s a Girl to Do?” is a clever, deceptively simple tracking shot of a nighttime bike ride - complete with a cohort of people in creepy animal masks. It’s enough to put you off cycling for life.

#8: “Men’s Needs” (2007)
The Cribs

This colourful extravaganza from cult Yorkshire band The Cribs marks their first mainstream radio breakthrough. And the video for “Men’s Needs” begins innocently enough - with a naked woman licking band members’ faces whilst they sing. There follows cartoonish mutilation and disembodiment by way of a meat cleaver, with the woman causing all kinds of unforseen chaos. From a headless frontman to an armless drummer, it’s a stylised bloodbath of brilliance.

#7: “Rock DJ” (2000)
Robbie Williams

To one of the biggest British pop stars of the ‘90s and noughties, ex-Take That star Robbie Williams proved a controversial figure at times. And he bared all for this memorable music video - and we really do mean all. Craving attention from an unimpressed bunch of roller skating women, Robbie starts a strip tease. But what to do when even the full monty falls short? And there he goes, stripping his skin off. It’s bare bone stuff!

#6: “Weapon of Choice” (2001)
Fatboy Slim

Directed by celebrated filmmaker Spike Jonze and featuring the inimitable Christopher Walken, the video for Fatboy Slim’s “Weapon of Choice” is still an instantly recognisable classic. So, let’s just sit back and admire Walken’s repertoire of moves shall we? Breezing through a deserted hotel - and at one stage even taking flight - it’s the actor as you’ve never seen him before. It’s rhythm and weightlessness and a wonder to watch. Definitely weird, but in the best possible way!

#5: “No Surprises” (1998)
Radiohead

Radiohead have been challenging the status quo since the moment they started out. And, this video for the fourth single from “OK Computer” continues their unique approach, which was also laid out with the animated accompaniment to “Paranoid Android”, and has since been retained in promos for songs like “Burn the Witch”. Simple yet powerful, just like the song itself, “No Surprises” features a close up of frontman Thom Yorke performing as his glass helmet gradually fills with water. It took multiple takes to get right, but the finished article is an iconic achievement.

#4: “Teardrop” (1998)
Massive Attack

Next, a foetus singing a song while still in its mother’s womb. A pretty weird premise, this video for Massive Attack’s “Teardrop” proves an absolute must for today’s list. The song itself has been featured on countless movies and TV shows - not least on Hugh Laurie’s Stateside smash hit, “House” - but the official video is slightly less well known. Again, it’s a simple concept mixed with marvellous execution, for an unforgettable four-and-a-half minutes.

#3: “Atmosphere” (1988)
Joy Division

A stand-out tune from a seminal post-punk band, “Atmosphere” was originally released in 1980, just a couple of months before Ian Curtis’ death. The video is one of only a handful of official promo productions for Joy Division tracks, and it was only made in line with the re-release of the single in 1988. But it was well worth the wait. An ominous and immersive black and white number, it showcases Curtis’ lyrical ability, through visuals that demand our attention.

#2: “Sledgehammer” (1986)
Peter Gabriel

Leaving Genesis certainly didn’t scupper Peter Gabriel’s creativity. His single “Sledgehammer” is not only his greatest solo success, but it boasts one of the strangest and most influential music videos of the ‘80s. Using a variety of animation techniques, especially stop-motion, Gabriel throws everything at his audience, translating his lyrics with psychedelic gusto. This groundbreaking effort elevated the music video form to new heights, scoring a record nine wins at the 1987 VMAs.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are some Honourable Mentions:

“Stand and Deliver” (1981)
Adam and the Ants

“The Hardest Part” (2006)
Coldplay

“Ashes to Ashes” (1980)
David Bowie

#1: “Total Eclipse of the Heart” (1983)
Bonnie Tyler

Some music videos strive for weirdness, and some have weirdness thrust upon them. Unlike most of today’s entries, this once-seen never-forgotten video doesn’t seem to set out with strangeness in mind. Bonnie Tyler’s ballard starts off quite conventional, with Tyler gazing intently out of her window. But wait, were those ninjas? Some boarding school kids, a dove and some gymnasts? And, then there’s the choir boys that are straight out of “Village of the Damned”. Nothing makes sense, but we just can’t stop watching!
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