Top 10 Best Blondie Songs

Script written by Craig Butler They were born in the punk world but made their mark on the pop charts. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Blondie songs. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. And we’re only choosing songs that Blondie both wrote and performed – so, sorry, no covers, no matter how good they are.  Special thanks to our user lockshockbarrel84 for suggesting this idea, check out the voting page at WatchMojo.comsuggest/Top+10+Blondie+Songs
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The Top 10 Blondie Songs


They were born in the punk world but made their mark on the pop charts. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Blondie songs. 

For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. And we’re only choosing songs that Blondie both wrote and performed – so, sorry, no covers, no matter how good they are. 

#10: “Sunday Girl” 
Parallel Lines (1978) 

While “Sunday Girl” was never a single in the U.S., it was enormously popular in the UK, easily topping the charts there – and it’s not hard to see why: this song is a perfect example of Blondie’s ability to deliver harshness wrapped in velvety ear candy. Debbie Harry’s laidback vocal and the bubbly arrangement project a feeling of delightful innocence. But the lyrics paint a picture of a lonely young girl, with a touch of “romantic fatalism” – as Rolling Stone put it; a sentiment the band hadn’t yet explored in depth. And, when Harry occasionally lets go with a little excitement, it really gives the song a special kick. 

#9: “Maria” 
No Exit (1999) 

When “Maria” hit the airwaves in 1999, it was Blondie’s first single since 1982. It didn’t cause much of a stir stateside, but in England it became the group’s sixth single to climb to #1. In some ways, “Maria” is classic Blondie. First, there’s a strong but not overpowering new wave beat that pulses throughout. That’s complemented by the distinctive chimes that had gained notice in Blondie’s earlier hit, “Rapture.” And, the lyrics describe a woman who exudes sex appeal that many find irresistible. All this, combined with the fact that the song’s production is basically an update of Phil Spector’s famous “Wall of Sound,” and you’ve got a little slice of pop Heaven. 

#8: “In the Flesh” 
Blondie (1976) 

The group’s self-titled debut album didn’t make much of a splash at first: hardcore punkers dismissed the band as too slick and self-aware; traditional rockers found them too new wave-y. But this single broke out in Australia, becoming a major hit there and setting the group on the path to success. “In the Flesh” features music with a definite girl group background, but the overt sexual desire in the lyrics is a long way off from the likes of the Shangri-Las. “In the Flesh” crystallized the Debbie Harry character – innocent yet knowing, cool as ice but somehow giving off sparks, and certainly nobody’s fool.

#7: “Atomic” 
Eat to the Beat (1979) 

Usually when a group tries to replicate an earlier success, the results are pretty disheartening. “Atomic” is a happy exception. Blondie was trying to recapture some of the sound of “Heart of Glass,” but as they worked on it, the song took on its own life and mood. Sure, the disco beat is there, wrapped up in that cool new wave vibe – but that guitar? It sounds like it wandered in outta some spaghetti Western movie. What’s even more surprising is that it works great in the mix. “Atomic” is one of those songs that just keeps building, finally threatening to explode all over the place – just like its namesake. 

#6: “Rip Her to Shreds” 
Blondie (1976) 

If “In the Flesh” was too poppy for punksters, “Rip Her to Shreds” demonstrated that Blondie could get down in the dirt with the best of ‘em. The bass line throbs with a painful energy, and keyboardist Jimmy Destri rides his riffs like they’re his lifeline. The sound is one of pure aggression, and the lyrics echo that – or do they? At first listen, Harry is seemingly giving the shaft to some rival that’s crossed her. The words drip both venom and disgust, with more than a little condescension. But as the song progresses, it seems that Harry’s actually repeating slurs that had once been cast at her. Whatever the case, it’s a killer song. 

#5: “Dreaming” 
Eat to the Beat (1979) 

Is it possible to create a purer pop sound than that heard on “Dreaming?” It’s sleek and glossy, yet it never succumbs to the plasticity found in pop songs that care only about their technical perfection. The synthesizer and the guitar are working in perfect harmony all through the song, helping build up an aural wall that serves as the ideal showcase for another of Harry’s ethereal yet earthy vocal performances. Blondie’s fondness for girl group-era tropes is there again, as is their ability to weave sounds from different eras seamlessly into one big pop statement.

#4: “Rapture” 
Autoamerican (1980) 

Blondie had always sampled different genres of music, usually to good effect, but they really stretched themselves with “Rapture.” This massive hit would deserve to be on this list if only for the fact that it was the first single featuring rap to hit #1 on the US pop charts. But even without that famous interlude, “Rapture” would be memorable for its deft fusion of funk and disco with some hip-hop trappings. True, Harry may not go down in history as one of the world’s great rappers, but she acquits herself nicely – and gets big points for trying something that at the time was so adventurous.

#3: “One Way or Another” 
Parallel Lines (1978) 

Another example of Blondie’s punk chops, “One Way or Another” rocks in the best way. The lyrics are a celebration of scary determination, derived from an ex-boyfriend of Harry’s who had stalker-ish inclinations. The music perfectly matches the sinister intent of the words; there’s something creepy about Nigel Harrison’s bass and about the way that guitar lick just keeps coming and coming. Plus, Harry’s vocal work really shines: her usual cool detached delivery is replaced by a sneering tone of menace. When she gets to singing about driving past her lover’s house, there’s a palpable perverseness in the air. Those who find Blondie a bit standoffish need to give this track another listen.

#2: “Call Me” 
“American Gigolo” soundtrack (1980) 

The group’s biggest US hit spent six weeks at the top of the charts – and with good reason. Collaborating with disco-meister Giorgio Moroder on a thematically appropriate song for the film “American Gigolo,” the group created a track that was relentless, driving and unescapably catchy. This is chromium-plated disco with a solid rock foundation, and it’s so propulsive that you can’t escape its icy grip – and you don’t want to. Harry’s lyrics encapsulate the hedonism of the era, but they’re clearly written with tongue placed firmly in cheek. And as usual, the woman’s sensuality pours out all over the song. 

Before we reveal our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions: 
- “X Offender” 
Blondie (1976) 

- “Eat to the Beat” 
Eat to the Beat (1979)

- “Picture This” 
Parallel Lines (1978) 

#1: “Heart of Glass” 
Parallel Lines (1978) 

The single that really broke Blondie worldwide, “Heart of Glass” started as a slower song with a different lyric. It took several years for it to evolve into its ultimate unforgettable final form. One of the key changes was giving the song a Euro-disco beat inspired by electronic band Kraftwerk. That accounts for the crystalline sheen the song gives off, with a synthesizer part that gracefully supports Harry’s light-as-air vocals. Everything comes together beautifully in what is one of the most perfectly produced singles ever. The song may’ve been too much for Blondie’s hardcore fans, but it introduced them to a much larger – and intensely appreciative – audience, ultimately reaching #1 in countries around the world. 
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