Top 5 Stimulating Myths About Coffee

Written by George Pacheco

Java. Joe. That sweet, sweet nectar of the gods. Prepare yourself because these myths are about to get roasted. Welcome to WatchMojo's Top 5 Myths […] In today's installment, we'll be talking about the five myths about coffee that left us beanboozled.

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Written by George Pacheco

Top 5 Coffee Myths


Java. Joe. That sweet, sweet nectar of the gods.
Prepare yourself because these myths are about to get roasted.
Welcome to WatchMojo's Top 5 Myths […]
In today's installment, we'll be talking about the five myths about coffee that left us beanboozled.

#5: Coffee will sober you up


So you've had a great night out with some friends, but now you're starting to feel the effects and pay the price for a wee too much alcohol. Time to fire up a nice, hot pot of coffee, right? Well, it may taste good, but that cup o' joe isn't going to do anything to alleviate the negative effects associated with intoxication. The caffeine in coffee may make you will make you FEEL more alert with regards to motor function, but that's about it; it doesn't do anything to assist the body in filtering out any alcohol. What's worse is that the jazzed feelings associated with that caffeine buzz may lead you to think that you're sobering up, when all you really need is some time and proper hydration.

#4: Coffee will help you lose weight


The next myth on our list has been around for a while, the theory that drinking coffee can assist in the body shedding a few excess pounds. Granted, there is a VERY slight increase in the body's metabolism with coffee, but not enough to promote any sort of noticeable weight loss. Drinking a few cups of java for dinner may serve as a slight and temporary appetite suppressant, but humanity can't live on coffee alone, and at some point, proper food will just have to be on the menu. Besides, adding excess caffeine to your diet may just lead to the jitters, so keep the cups black if you can, or at the very least keep track of any milk or sugar calories you're adding to the mix.

#3: Coffee stunts your growth


This one is another old wives tale with absolutely no scientific evidence to support it, at the end of the day. The roots of coffee stunting one's growth are likely associated with the caffeine found within coffee than the beverage itself, with the idea being that children drinking Joe at an early age would be at risk for osteoporosis. A Creighton University study researched the effects of caffeine and lowered bone density within both children and the elderly, with one commonality being the lack of a calcium rich diet. So the takeaway, then is this: coffee itself won't stunt your growth, but if you're not getting the proper amounts of calcium, then drinking excessive caffeinated beverages isn't going to do your bones any favors.

#2: The Darker the Roast, the Stronger the Buzz


Many coffee enthusiasts might point to the stronger, bolder taste of dark-brewed coffees as evidence of their increased caffeine content. This is only a myth, however, as dark roast blends actually have less caffeine than their lighter-brewed counterparts. The reasoning behind this has to do with the style of coffee bean used for the roast. Arabica beans are commonly found in coffee shops, and possess a high quality taste, as opposed to the Robusta beans, which make up for their lack of flavor with a huge burst of caffeinated power. So that dark roast Starbucks may taste like a million bucks, but it really isn't adding any more caffeine to your day than the average, quickie cup of light roast coffee at your local gas station or mini-mart.

#1: Coffee dehydrates you


So here's the deal behind this popular myth: coffee is prepared with water, and you're drinking it with every cup. It is true that caffeine can occasionally possess a diuretic effect in some people - in other words, it makes you pee-but there's no actual scientific evidence connecting moderate coffee consumption with fluid loss. In fact, The University of Birmingham conducted a study in 2014 which tracked the hydration of individuals who drank only coffee, before switching it out for an equal amount of H20. The results found that the caffeine found in coffee did nothing to affect the body's level of hydration, although drinking plenty of water is still the best way to rehydrate without the jitters or restlessness excessive caffeine can cause the body during sleep time. Still, the myth that coffee dehydrates you is just that: a myth.

So how many of these myths did you believe? For more dark roast top tens and metabolizing top fives, please subscribe to WatchMojo.com!
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