Top 10 Creedence Clearwater Revival Songs

Script written by Aaron Cameron. Creedence Clearwater Revival only existed for a short five years, but in that time managed to create seven studio albums, three in 1969 alone, and left a legacy of hit songs which still receive significant airplay today. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Creedence Clearwater Revival songs. Special thanks to our users Jack Morris, BoatingTurtle, .Titus_Maximus., Miika Soini, afarrelly, Nico_CABJ, Travis P, Lorenzo Adolfo Castanon Gonzalez, Richard Bain, The Uncharted Virgin, BlackPikmin1998, Raymond Leduc and wx30th for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Script written by Aaron Cameron.

Top 10 Creedence Clearwater Revival Songs


They may not have been born on the bayou but they’re still kings of the swamp. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Creedence Clearwater Revival songs.

CCR only existed for a short five years but in that time managed to create seven studio albums, three in 1969 alone, and left a legacy of hit songs which still receive significant airplay today. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs.

#10: “Up Around the Bend”
“Up Around the Bend” single (1970)

Although misunderstood in the UK as a celebration of madness, this is in fact a hard-charging anthem of optimism. Released with “Run Through the Jungle,” the single topped out at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100. Spiritually, “Up Around the Bend” is the polar opposite of its flip side and at just under 3 minutes, it is pure CCR with a killer riff, story-telling verses, and catchy choruses. It was later included on the album Cosmo’s Factory.

#9: “Travelin’ Band”
“Travelin’ Band” single (1970)

By 1970, CCR had already released four albums and as such, spent a lot of time on the road touring. Written as an ode to that lifestyle and an homage to ‘50s rock and roll, “Travelin’ Band” actually triggered a lawsuit settled out of court in 1972 by publishers who felt it was a little too close to Little Richard’s “Good Golly, Miss Molly.” A top 2 pop hit, the rock and roll and roots rocker has since been covered by multiple artists.

#8: “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”
Pendulum (1970)

While many speculate this tune is about the Vietnam War or the end of the hippie dream, John Fogerty has said it was about the building tension within the group. Band members were fighting the frontman for control, artistic freedom and to write songs. Though Fogerty’s older brother and rhythm guitarist Tom opted leave Creedence shortly after the song’s release single to begin a solo career, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain” was a top ten U.S. hit for CCR and a gold-seller.

#7: “Run Through the Jungle”
“Up Around the Bend” single (1970)

Released as a single with our number 10 pick, this track was considered one chart entry with “Up Around the Bend” and so reached the top 10 of the pop charts with its jungle sound effects, harmonica, and its blues rock and roots rocks sound. It also went on to spark one of the weirdest piracy lawsuits in music history. In 1984, the now-solo John Fogerty released the song “The Old Man Down the Road,” which his former label, and former band mates, thought sounded eerily similar to the 1970 hit. Fogerty beat the court case with his guitar and probably wishes he did the same to his band mates.

#6: “Down on the Corner”
Willy and the Poor Boys (1969)

Like the Beatles with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, Fogerty and company also tried their hand at an alter ego. Unlike the Fab Four though, CCR limited the gimmick to just the one song, but “Down on the Corner” sure is a toe tapper. Chronicling the jug-band adventures of Willy and the Poor Boys, the top 3 track’s lyrics also lent itself to the album’s title, with the band even dressing the part for the cover.

#5: “Who’ll Stop the Rain”
“Travelin’ Band” single (1970)

Like many CCR tracks, this song does tap into the spirit of the late ‘60s and is often thought to be a protest of the Vietnam War. However, it’s actually said to have been inspired by just the opposite: Woodstock. Although they elected not to appear in the film, Creedence was actually one of the headlining bands at the festival where it quite famously rained. A lot. Another top five single on the Billboard pop singles charst, “Who’ll Stop the Rain” is CCR at their folk rock best.

#4: “Born on the Bayou”
Bayou Country (1969)

Although deeply wrapped in Southern imagery – and plaid shirts – John Fogerty and the rest of CCR were actually from sunny California. While the childhood described in the song is pure fiction, the sound nonetheless rang true with music fans. “Born on the Bayou” didn’t only become a Creedence signature song but a staple of the swamp rock sound. Owing largely to its iconic intro, the tune was a regular show opener for CCR and for Fogerty’s solo concerts.

#3: “Bad Moon Rising”
Green River (1969)

The apocalypse never sounded quite as jolly as it did on this chart-topper. A #2 US hit and #1 in the UK, “Bad Moon Rising” was inspired by the 1941 film “The Devil and Daniel Webster.” Doom and gloom aside, the upbeat tune is also home to one of the most misheard lyrics of all time, with many mishearing “there’s a bad moon on the rise” as “there’s a bathroom, on the right”. Seems legit: It was even an entry on our Top 10 Misheard Lyrics video.

#2: “Proud Mary”
Bayou Country (1969)

Backed as a single with our number 4 entry, “Born in the Bayou,” this classic hit #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1969. Musically, the song’s intro was inspired by Beethoven’s “Fifth Symphony” – which did not chart – while lyrically, the song draws on steamboat imagery, which helped build the band’s swamp image. “Proud Mary” is the most covered tune in the CCR catalogue, with renditions from every one from Ike and Tina Turner to...Leonard Nimoy?

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions.
- “Lookin’ Out My Back Door”
Cosmo’s Factory (1970)
- “Green River”
Green River (1969)
- “Lodi”
Green River (1969)
- “Long As I Can See the Light”
Cosmo’s Factory (1970)
- “The Midnight Special”
Willy and the Poor Boys (1969)

#1: “Fortunate Son”
Willy and the Poor Boys (1969)

Released as a single with our #6 pick, “Down on the Corner”, this rocking and edgy protest song was a #3 hit in December of ‘69. Written at the height of the Vietnam War and taking a strong anti-war stance, “Fortunate Son” also respected the soldiers involved in the conflict. Songwriter John Fogerty takes swipes at the class system, citing preferential treatment among the rich and powerful. Thanks to its charging rock sound and passion, the 2-and-a-half minute number is often considered one of the ‘60s greatest songs and is hence, our number one.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite CCR song? For more swampy Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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