Top 10 Comedy Movies of the 1960s

Script written by Max Lett. The swinging ‘60s were a time of crazy style and hilarious comedy. In this video, WatchMojo.com counts down our picks for the Top 10 comedies of the 1960s. For our series on the Top Comedies of All Time, we’ve chosen comedy films per decade based on their iconic status, critical acclaim, box-office success, watchability and, of course, how funny they are. This is part of a series of videos spanning the decades of comedic films from the 1930s to the 2000s. Special thanks to our users Ovidijus Gelzinis, moereinhart and Shawn Mark for submitting the idea on our Suggestions Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
Credits
Tags
Comments

You must login to access this feature

Transcript
Script written by Max Lett.

Top 10 Comedy Movies of the 1960s


The swinging sixties were a time of crazy style and hilarious comedy. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the Top 10 comedies of the 1960s.

For our series on the Top Comedies of All Time, we’ve chosen comedy films per decade based on their iconic status, critical acclaim, box-office success, watchability and, of course, how funny they are. This is part of a series of videos spanning the decades of comedic films from the 1930s to the 2000s.

#10: “Bedazzled” (1967)

Back in the swinging ‘60s, the comedy pairing of Dudley Moore and Peter Cook was all the rage. An updated take on the Faustian tale, “Bedazzled” pits Cook as The Devil against Moore as Stanley Moon in a story that sees the latter selling his soul to the former for happiness. What follows is hilarious sequence of what-if?-type sketches in which Moon sees what his life would be like under different terms. While the film wasn’t an instant classic, it slowly gained a cult following over the years thanks to its acting, smarts and laughs.

#9: “The Apartment” (1960)

Jack Lemmon was also a hot property back in the ‘60s and this comedy-drama manages to balance his pitch-perfect comedic timing with the actor’s more vulnerable side. While “The Apartment” stays mostly within the realms of the possible, the movie does go over the top and even screwball at times – and that’s just the way Lemmon likes it. The result is a comedy classic with risqué themes that managed to pull off five Oscar wins out of a total of 10 nominations.

#8: “The Nutty Professor” (1963)

Before Eddie Murphy portrayed an entire cast of characters in the ‘90s remake, there was this flick starring Jerry Lewis. Lewis, as doctor Julius Kelp, becomes a Jekyll/Hyde type character when he ingests a strange elixir and transforms into the suave and sophisticated Buddy Love. Before special effects and fat-suits, Lewis had to play two completely different characters purely based on his acting skills and a couple of costume changes. The result is a hilarious comic sci-fi tale about a scientist who strives to become more.

#7: “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” (1963)

The funniest comedians of the time were assembled to create this gut-busting epic comedy about a group of treasure hunters trying to outrun each other to collect a hidden fortune. The ensemble comedy’s pairings of actors, like Mickey Rooney and Buddy Hackett, make for some of the most hilarious scenes in cinema history. The premise is simple but allows for each separate actor to stretch their comedy muscles and make this an Oscar-winning, critically acclaimed and box office hit.

#6: “The Odd Couple” (1968)

Mix Walter Matthau’s always-grumpy disposition and Jack Lemmon’s wild personality and what do you get? Not your average couple - that’s for sure! This film’s comedy comes from the contrasting interplay between its two divorced male characters as they begin to take on roles similar to that of husband and wife. In contrast to the black comedy’s title, the two actors and comedians actually make the perfect pair here; at least, they do when it comes to knowing how to get the critics raving and movie-watchers rolling in the aisles!

#5: “The Party” (1968)

Peter Sellers was a man of a thousand faces and he never fails to put a smile on ours. This Blake Edwards-directed film was very much a vehicle for his improv skills and brilliant physical humor. From the opening scene to the very last shot, Sellers plays a clumsy Indian actor who pratfalls and splutters through a Hollywood party to which he was inadvertently invited. The result is many an awkward conversation, multiple hilarious misunderstandings and a cult comedy classic.

#4: “The Producers” (1968)

Mel Brooks’ very first theatrical effort foreshadows his meteoric rise in the comedy genre. “The Producers” is a riot from start to finish thanks to hilarious performances from Gene Wilder and Zero Mostel. As Leo Bloom and Max Bialystock, the actors play two conniving men who are attempting to produce a play that’ll be a flop in order to make more money. Complete with crazy and colorful musical numbers that continue to impress even to this day, the dark comedy is an enticing satire and tons of fun.

#3: “The Graduate” (1967)

If you want to take a break from the slapstick comedies of the decade, this film starring Dustin Hoffman in his breakout role should do the trick. Instead of sight gags and puns, “The Graduate” gets the job done with subtle satire and wonderful Oscar-nominated performances. Anne Bancroft is enchanting as the older woman who alternately tries to seduce Hoffman’s character and ruin his life. It’s funny, sharp and touching.

#2: “The Pink Panther” (1963)

It was his role as the bumbling Inspector Jacques Clouseau that catapulted Peter Sellers to international fame as a comedic actor. Sellers may’ve only been a supporting actor in “The Pink Panther” but his scene-stealing performance as the inept officer who pratfalls his way through a mystery that has everyone else baffled is what made the film such a classic. It’s no mistake that it spawned so many sequels, most notably "A Shot in the Dark," which introduced us to Clouseau's trademark French accent and fine-tuned the character's comedic elements, as well as a cartoon series.

Before we unveil our pick for Comedy of the 1960s, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “A Woman Is a Woman” (1961)
- “Take the Money and Run” (1969)
- “Make Mine Mink” (1960)

#1: “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” (1964)

Stanley Kubrick was the master of genre-bending films and this Cold War pre-apocalyptic political black comedy is widely regarded as one of his greatest efforts. While the movie isn't outright hilarious, the intense performances by all the supporting actors in contrast to Peter Sellers’ own master of disguise style of comedy are genuinely funny and cement “Dr. Strangelove” as a cinematic piece of art.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite 1960s comedy? For more hilarious Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
Download

You must register to a corporate account to download. Please login

Related Videos

+ see more

More Top 10