Top 10 Songs Named After Women

These tunes are dedicated to the fairer sex. For this list, we’ve chosen songs named after women based on a mix of their quality, success, the story behind the lyrics, their pop culture relevance and iconic status. We’ve only included songs that have a woman’s first name in the title, so sorry to “Mrs. Robinson” and “Ms. Jackson.” Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 songs named after women. Special thanks to our users Justin Pauge, Hykel Mohamed, Cole Pollock, rockinrussianboy, Arthur Scrapper Broady and TheBigBigCheese for submitting the idea on our Suggestions Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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These tunes are dedicated to the fairer sex. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 songs named after women.

For this list, we’ve chosen songs named after women based on a mix of their quality, success, the story behind the lyrics, their pop culture relevance and iconic status. We’ve only included songs that have a woman’s first name in the title, so sorry to “Mrs. Robinson” and “Ms. Jackson.”

#10: “Maggie May” (1971)
Rod Stewart

Though it was only the B-side to his “Reason to Believe” single, “Maggie May” ended up being the favorite among American DJs. As such, the folk rock number became Rod Stewart’s first chart-topper as a solo artist. Based on his real life experience of losing his virginity to an older woman, the Every Picture Tells a Story track also offered relatable lyrics and an easy-listening vibe that made it one of his signature tunes.

#9: “Sweet Caroline” (1969)
Neil Diamond

Several versions of this soft rock song exist, but it’s the sweet sentiment and memorable melody that have made this Neil Diamond track so popular. Charting within the Billboard top 5, “Sweet Caroline” touched many music lovers and romantics around the world, selling over 1 million copies. Over 30 years after its release, Diamond confessed the song was inspired by JFK’s daughter Caroline Kennedy.

#8: “Come on Eileen” (1982)
Dexys Midnight Runners

Mixing soul and Celtic folk for their sophomore effort, the English pop group found chart-topping success in both their native UK and in the U.S. with that album’s second single. Featuring fiddle, saxophone, accordion and trombone – to name a few – “Come On Eileen” had us “humming this tune forever.” Though the Dexys had a previous number one in the UK, “Eileen” and her “pretty red dress” remain the band’s biggest chart success in most countries around the world.

#7: “Jolene” (1973)
Dolly Parton

Country music is known for its straightforward and often-literal lyrics so it’s not surprising that many songs from this genre are based on real-life experiences. Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” is no exception; in fact, the singer-songwriter has revealed that the single’s namesake is based on a bank teller “with flaming locks of auburn hair” that she thought was flirting with her husband. The title track to her 13th solo record went on to top the American country charts – so we guess the jealousy was worth it.

#6: “Cecilia” (1970)
Simon & Garfunkel

This follow-up to Simon & Garfunkel’s chart-topping “Bridge Over Troubled Water” single is usually believed to be about a woman who breaks the singer’s heart every day they’re together. But it’s also been suggested that the pop and folk rock tune refers to the patron saint of music, St. Cecilia. Regardless of how you interpret it, there’s no denying its up-tempo and catchy nature, which undoubtedly helped “Cecilia” make the top 10 of various charts worldwide.

#5: “Roxanne” (1978)
The Police

Thanks to their fusion of reggae rock and new wave, the second single ever by The Police clinched them their first top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. But it’s the tale of a man’s love for a hooker that really makes “Roxanne” stand out. Frontman Sting came up with the idea while the band was on tour in France and found their hotel surrounded by prostitutes. It’s since become a top 20 UK hit and one of their most well-known songs.

#4: “Angie” (1973)
The Rolling Stones

There are several rumors about who or what the “Angie” in this Rolling Stones song is; ranging from David Bowie’s ex-wife to Keith Richards’ daughter and even heroin. Make what you will about the lyrics, but the acoustic, blues rock ballad does seem like it’s directed to a particular woman – on the surface, at least. Written by Richards and Mick Jagger, the single also topped the Billboard Hot 100 and peaked with the top 10 of the UK charts.

#3: “Eleanor Rigby” (1966)
The Beatles

Since “Michelle” isn’t as well known and “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” is allegedly about LSD, we’ve picked this 2-minute Revolver track for our list. With its baroque pop sound and use of strings, the Fab Four created a moody piece that really brought out its theme of loneliness, especially during old age. It may not be based on anyone they personally knew, but “Eleanor Rigby” still connected with fans and music critics so well it nabbed The Beatles three Grammy nods, one of which they took home.

#2: “Layla” (1971)
Derek and the Dominos

Often considered Eric Clapton’s magnum opus, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs is a blues-rock classic. But it’s thanks to its standout title cut, with its distinctive guitar riff complemented by Duane Allman’s slide guitar chops, that “Layla” is ingrained into memories. Not to mention the fact that it’s actually about Slowhand’s unrequited love for George Harrison’s then-wife Pattie Boyd. The love song proved its staying power when Clapton’s Unplugged solo version won a Grammy over two decades later.

Before we unveil our number one pick, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “My Sharona” (1979) The Knack
- “Black Betty” (1977) Ram Jam
- “Delilah” (1968) Tom Jones
- “Proud Mary” (1969) Creedence Clearwater Revival
- “Valerie” (1982) Steve Winwood

#1: “Billie Jean” (1983)
Michael Jackson

Though we could've chosen "Dirty Diana," it's the irreplaceable bass line and Michael Jackson’s trademark vocal hiccups on “Billie Jean” that have made it a pop classic. With its perfect blend of dance, pop and R&B, the song earned critical acclaim and topped the Billboard Hot 100 for seven weeks. But it’s the track’s story of a groupie claiming Jackson fathered her son that lands it here. With over 3 million copies sold and a music video that shattered racial boundaries, “Billie Jean” also helped cement the King of Pop’s place in music history.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite song named after a woman? For more entertaining top 10s, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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