Top 10 Animated Villain Songs Excluding Disney

Script written by Craig Butler. Sometimes it seems like the bad guys get all the best lines – and sometimes the best songs, too. For this list, we’re focusing on songs sung by or about villains from animated movie productions that were not originally produced by Disney. They can be from theatrical films or from those made for the small screen. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 animated villain songs that are not from a Disney production. Special thanks to our users Jamesfan1991, Brennan Young, vampbear, 009fluttershyizard, DiscipleOfAnakin313, Jeremy Lee, Nawaf Al-Ajmi and BDenum100 for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Script written by Craig Butler.

Sometimes it seems like the bad guys get all the best lines – and sometimes the best songs, too. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 animated villain songs that are not from a Disney production.

For this list, we’re focusing on songs sung by or about villains from animated movie productions that were not originally produced by Disney. They can be from theatrical films or from those made for the small screen.

#10: “Top of the Woods”
“Hoodwinked!” (2005)

One of the delights of 2005’s “Hoodwinked” is watching the seemingly innocent Boingo turn from a cuddly little creature to an evil mastermind. His big number, “Top of the Woods,” is a jaunty, strutting song of triumph to his unbridled ambition – and the title even pays sly homage to James Cagney’s famous “top of the world” catchphrase in “White Heat.”

#9: “It’s Terror Time Again”
“Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island” (1998)

Alt-rockers Skycycle contributed two songs to “Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island,” but it’s the memorable “It’s Terror Time Again” that’s a keeper. Not sung by any of the characters but used to set the mood for a zombie chase sequence, the lyrics are filled with classically spooky references. And the music really rocks, in a chillin’ late ‘90s kinda way. Just the thing Scooby, Shaggy and the gang needed to update themselves and give them a slightly darker tone.

#8: “Ruber”
“Quest for Camelot” (1998)

A villain needs a special kind of evil if he’s going to overcome the goodness of the legendary King Arthur; and “Quest for Camelot’s” Sir Ruber fits the bill. Cunning and enormously powerful, he also gets a slinkily vile song that sets out his manifesto in musical terms. It’s pure megalomania set to melody – just the right ingredients for a great villain song.

#7: “No More Mr. Nice Guy”
“The Swan Princess” (1994)

Medieval magicians make natural bad guys. All those trappings – Middle Ages clothing, chilly castle settings, unfortunate hairstyle, and awesome enchantments – just cry out for a villainous verse or two. Rothbart in “The Swan Princess” is only too happy to comply – with “No More Mr. Nice Guy,” a razzmatazzy show biz tune that gives the muscle-bound meanie plenty of opportunity to demonstrate his flair for mischief.

#6: “Master of the Seas”
“Ice Age: Continental Drift” (2012)

Sea shanties are strange things: even if a person hates them, he can’t help but tap his feet and get a little caught up in them. Really insidious. That’s what makes them great choices for characters like Captain Gutt, who uses the infectious melody to sugarcoat his vile ambitions. Sailing the seas on his icy ship, the ape explains that he’s a first class pirate – and anyone on his ship better embrace the pirate lifestyle.

#5: “I Can Change”
“South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut” (1999)

Good taste never being a concern for the mad men behind “South Park,” so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that their contribution to the villain song world is sung by their version of Saddam Hussein. Or that its lyrics aren’t exactly G-rated. But they’re hysterical, and this twisted take on the late Iraqi leader demonstrates Trey Parker and Matt Stone’s ability to stand traditional musical theatre conventions on their ear.

#4: “Playing with the Big Boys”
“The Prince of Egypt” (1998)

Nothing brings out the ego in a villain like a little competition. When the Egyptian priests Huy and Hotep are confronted with the upstart Moses, they put him in his place in the most effective way – by singing. “Playing with Big Boys” gives songwriter Stephen Schwartz ample opportunity to use clever word play, Middle Eastern-tinged music and the character’s snide self-confidence to create a first class villain song.

#3: “In the Dark of the Night”
“Anastasia” (1997)

Broadway tunesmiths Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens created the score for “Anastasia,” and they outdid themselves with this number for Rasputin. “In the Dark of the Night” details Rasputin’s obsession with destroying Anastasia; there’s no doubt about what this bad guy is after. The driving rhythm and the heavenly-sounding hellish choir add to the song’s intensity and feeling of inevitable destruction.

#2: “Toxic Love”
“FernGully: The Last Rainforest” (1992)

If you want an incredibly evil guy vocal performance, look no further than Tim Curry. “FernGully: The Last Rainforest” got him, and they gave him a song worthy of his uniquely despicable talents. “Toxic Love,” written by Thomas Dolby, is a demonic ode to destruction and is simultaneously chilling and thrilling. Songs about evil spirits shouldn’t be so intoxicating.

Before we reveal our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “Don’t Make Me Laugh” “The Pebble and the Penguin” (1995)
- “It Feels So Good to Be Bad” “All Dogs Go to Heaven 2” (1996)
- “On the Road” “Thumbelina” (1994)
- “Money Is Such a Beautiful Word” “Tom and Jerry: The Movie” (1993)
- “How Bad Can I Be?” “The Lorax” (2012)

#1: “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch”
“Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” (1966)

It may have been recorded in the 1960s, but “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” still delights listeners today. Dr. Seuss’ clever, conversational lyrics make a straightforward statement and then back it up with surprising yet appropriate examples. Albert Hague’s music catches the ear on the first note and never lets go. And Thurl Ravenscroft’s basso performance simply couldn’t be better. A perfect portrait of a perfect scoundrel – and perfectly entertaining.

Do you agree with our choices? What other evil melodies should we have put on this list? For more enthralling top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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