Top 10 Dr. Dre Songs

Script written by David MacIntyre. No matter how old these songs are, he’s still D.R.E. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Though we’ve excluded songs where he acted only as a producer, we have included tracks where he is a featured artist as well as those he performed with other groups. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Dr. Dre songs. Special thanks to our users superbad333, Moses Delira, Al Bebak, Mike Apostolakos and Diego Cortes for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
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Script written by David MacIntyre.

No matter how old these songs are, he’s still D.R.E. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Dr. Dre songs.

For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Though we’ve excluded songs where he acted only as a producer, we have included tracks where he is a featured artist as well as those he performed with other groups.

#10: “The Next Episode” Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Dogg, Kurupt & Nate Dogg
2001 (1999)

Coming at the midway point of Dre’s sophomore effort is this banger, which also features Snoop Dogg, fellow former Death Row artist Kurupt and the late, great Nate Dogg. With the title referencing Dre and Snoop’s “Nuthin’ But a G Thang”, this hip hop, gangsta rap and G-Funk track charted very well overseas and at home too. But it also stands out for its big production value and lyrics about blazing it up, California bud, smoking weed every day, and, well, you get the picture.

#9: “Guilty Conscience” Eminem feat. Dr. Dre
The Slim Shady LP (1999)

On this creepy-sounding track from Eminem’s first major label album, Dre and Slim trade bars with each other as Dre plays someone’s conscience. More specifically, he takes on the role of an angel telling Marshall Mathers’ devil what he should or shouldn’t be doing. Featuring elements of horrorcore and comedy hip hop, the tune went two times platinum in the U.S. despite not making the Billboard Hot 100, and was one of the singles that helped bring Eminem to prominence in the music world.

#8: “Fuck tha Police” N.W.A.
Straight Outta Compton (1988)

Although other N.W.A. songs could have easily made the list in its place, including “Straight Outta Compton,” this one makes the grade for its aggressive nature and controversial themes. On this track, Dre plays the judge while MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E provide their “testimonies” in a trial against the LAPD. Not surprisingly, the protest song caused plenty of controversy, even inciting the FBI to warn the group’s labels against it – but it remains a significant piece of music.

#7: “Natural Born Killaz” Dr. Dre & Ice Cube
“Murder Was the Case” soundtrack (1994)

One of several Dre singles to have been made for a movie rather than an album, this collaboration between him and former N.W.A. member Ice Cube marked the first time they’d worked together since the group’s demise. Executive produced by notorious Death Row CEO Suge Knight, the paranormal-inspired number is memorable for having Dre and Ice Cube trade bars over a trademark West Coast G-Funk beat.

#6: “What’s the Difference” Dr. Dre feat. Eminem & Xzibit
2001 (1999)

Eminem and Xzibit join forces with Dre on this track based around a slamming beat full of horns sampled from a song by French singer Charles Aznavour. With one long verse each, these three are in tip top form as they spit bars recounting their rise to the top, bragging about their wealth, and in Eminem’s case, deciding whether or not to kill his child’s mother.

#5: “Fuck wit Dre Day (And Everybody’s Celebratin’)” Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Doggy Dogg
The Chronic (1992)

The Chronic had plenty of great tracks, including “Let Me Ride”, but this one is notable for being one of the most commercially successful diss tracks in rap history, making it to number eight on the Billboard Hot 100. Dre and Snoop jump on this tune as an opportunity to diss Dre’s former N.W.A. group-mate Eazy-E as well as rappers Tim Dog and Luther Campbell. The following year, Eazy-E dropped a double-platinum EP as a response to Dre’s album.

#4: “Forgot About Dre” Dr. Dre feat. Eminem
2001 (1999)

With a beat that samples a No Doubt guitar riff, this hardcore hip-hop number shows Dre responding to his haters in the most brutal way possible, while Slim Shady drops a deadly hook and verse in the process. The collaboration paid off commercially too, as the song made the top 30 of the Billboard Hot 100 charts and won both Dre and Eminem a Grammy.

#3: “California Love” 2Pac feat. Dr. Dre & Roger Troutman

“California Love” single (1995) and All Eyez on Me (UK Version) (1996)
Although this was 2Pac’s big comeback single after he got outta jail, it’s Dre’s opening verse that really sets this track into motion. Over a pulsating beat with an auto-tuned hook from late Zapp vocalist Roger Troutman, this song hit the top of the Billboard charts in the mid-‘90s and – as you’d expect – quickly became an anthem for the state of California.

#2: “Still D.R.E.” Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Dogg
2001 (1999)

After he went seven years between albums, Dre announced his comeback in a massive way with this album’s first single. With lyrics co-written by Jay-Z and his partner-in-crime Snoop Dogg in tow, Dre brought us a banger of a tune that sold over four million copies and cracked the Billboard Hot 100. Let’s not forget its music video full of low-riders, scantily clad women, and cameos from Eminem and Xzibit.

Before we unveil our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “Chin Check” N.W.A. feat. Snoop Dogg
“Next Friday” soundtrack (1999)
- “Been There, Done That” Dr. Dre
The Aftermath (1996)
- “Bitches Ain’t Shit” Dr. Dre feat. Jewell, Lady of Rage, Tha Dogg Pound & Snoop Doggy Dogg
The Chronic (1992)
- “Deep Cover” Dr. Dre & Snoop Dogg
“Deep Cover” soundtrack (1992)
- “Bitch Please II” Eminem feat. Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, etc.
The Marshall Mathers LP (2000)

#1: “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang” Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Dogg
The Chronic (1992)

Could it have been anything else? Quite simply, this was the track that brought West Coast G-Funk to the attention of the masses, made Snoop Dogg a star almost overnight, and gave Dre a reputation as a solid solo artist after his days in N.W.A. It nearly topped the Billboard charts when it was released, and many music publications have since called it the greatest song in the history of rap music.

Do you agree with our list? Which Dr. Dre track is your all-time favorite? With new top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
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