Top 10 Monty Python’s Flying Circus Moments

Script written by Max Lett. And now for something completely different… For this list, we’re only including the best sketches from Monty Python’s TV career – so grab your dead parrot, bust out the spam and let’s get the funny walks started. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Monty Python TV moments. Special thanks to our users jwiking62, barllt, Jaime Enrique Gutierrez Pérez, Christopher Sturniolo and Robbie Mckimson for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.comsuggest
Credits
Tags
Comments

You must login to access this feature

Transcript
Script written by Max Lett.

And now for something completely different… Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 Monty Python TV moments.

For this list, we’re only including the best sketches from Monty Python’s TV career – so grab your dead parrot, bust out the spam and let’s get the funny walks started.

#10: “Upper Class Twit of the Year”

This sketch is centered around an obstacle course designed for the upper crust of British society. Because the contenders are, for the most part, completely witless, the race involves such classic Olympic events as “Kicking the Beggar,” “Walking a Straight Line” and “Reversing into the Old Lady.” The course concludes with a tricky obstacle during which the Upper-Class twits must shoot themselves in the head. Jolly good show!

#9: “Cheese Shop”

It’s the eternal debate: Cheddar or Swiss, Brie or Edam? Well, struggle no further because this shop offers none of them. Cleverly disguised as a purveyor of cheese, Michael Palin’s character comes up with increasingly convoluted reasons for his store’s obvious lack of stock. As John Cleese runs through a frankly impressive list of cheeses, the situation grows grim when it becomes obvious he won’t be getting what he came for.

#8: “Argument Clinic”

Seemingly an exercise in futility, Michael Palin walks into a clinic whose sole purpose is to provide unpleasant social experiences. The character pays good money to engage in a squabble, but the situation doesn’t go his way. Obviously they didn’t have a YouTube comments section in those days.

#7: “Self Defense Against Fresh Fruit”

What’s more terrifying than an armed mugger? In this sketch, John Cleese shows us how to successfully throw off a possible fruit-attack armed with nothing but our wits, some ingenuity and a secret technique. Sadly, lunatics armed with fresh fruit might be ready for that old trick so it’s important to improvise with what you’ve got.

#6: “Candid Photography” [aka “Nudge Nudge”]

Terry Jones is just trying to enjoy his drink in a bar when another patron accosts him. And Eric Idle only has one thing on his mind. A brief line of questioning ensues where it becomes obvious what Idle wants to talk about. This classic sketch brings us a line we still know and use today, and also spoofs the prudish mindset of the time.

#5: “The Ministry of Silly Walks”

There are no words to define this classic sketch; but here are some anyway: the Python troops send up their very own British government in usual fashion when Michael Palin attempts to subsidize a new silly walk he’s perfecting. Unfortunately it’s just not silly enough, as proven by John Cleese’s own impressively flexible stride. The sketch pokes fun at the seemingly impractical nature of the government at the time.

#4: “The Funniest Joke in the World”

Very much a product of post-World War II British society, the Pythons go back to their roots in this vignette about a joke so funny it literally kills. There are precautions to be followed when going near this joke. In fact, it’s so deadly; it was soon translated to German and used on the battlefront. Fortunately, the Germans weren’t able to synthesize their own deadly gag.

#3: “Homicidal Barber”/“The Lumberjack Song”

Enter a man who never wanted to be a Barber anyway, who dreamed of nothing but experiencing the great outdoors. All he wanted was to sing and frolic in the forests and name all the trees he could. Michael Palin is a man’s man, a virile lumberjack who…wait a second. Unfortunately, Palin’s dream isn’t shared by the rest of the cast.

#2: “Spam”

Doesn’t this happen to everyone? A cross-dressing Graham Chapman sits down in a restaurant and orders breakfast, only to discover there’s just one thing on the menu. It’s a post-war lampoon of the country’s overstock of Spam and also a delightful sing-a-long with some memorable lyrics. Don’t say it too often though, or else Vikings.

Before we name our pick for the Upper Class Twit of the Year, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “The Spanish Inquisition”
- “The Fish-Slapping Dance”
- “Hell’s Grannies”
- “The Restaurant Sketch”

#1: “Dead Parrot Sketch”

How many different ways can you say “dead”? This sketch is an exercise in synonyms as John Cleese attempts to return a slightly defective parrot. Ever the appeasing shop owner, Michael Palin tries to assuage his costumer’s assertion that the bird is, well… dead. Maybe one of their most popular sketches of all time, “Dead Parrot” is a timeless struggle between customer and seller about faulty merchandise.

Do you agree with our list? What’s your favorite Monty Python sketch? For more hilarious Top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.
Download

You must register to a corporate account to download. Please login

Related Videos

+ see more

More Top 10