History of NASCAR

The origins of NASCAR can be traced back to the prohibition era. The transportation of alcohol had become a huge business and these bootlegging runs created the need for self-modified vehicles capable of evading police. These stock modifications were based on boosting speed and handling. Following the de-criminalization of alcohol in 1933, Daytona Beach instead became a popular place to set world land speed records in stock cars. There, it was first conceived of as an organization by a mechanic, turned gas station owner and racing enthusiast named William France Sr. Join WatchMojo.com as we learn more about NASCAR.
Credits
Tags
Comments

You must login to access this feature

Transcript
History of NASCAR

This is one of the most popular and most viewed professional sports in the United States, and is today broadcast in over 150 countries around the world. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’ll be learning more about NASCAR.

The origins of NASCAR can be traced back to the prohibition era. The transportation of alcohol had become a huge business and these bootlegging runs created the need for self-modified vehicles capable of evading police. These stock modifications were based on boosting speed and handling, as well as cargo capacity. Following the de-criminalization of alcohol in 1933, Daytona Beach instead became a popular place to set world land speed records in these stock cars.

Interestingly, NASCAR, otherwise known as the National Association for Stock Car Racing was first conceived of by a mechanic, turned gas station owner and racing enthusiast named William France Sr. He was just one of many attracted to Daytona Beach for its various automotive events, featuring coupes, hardtops, convertibles and sports cars. However, a distinct lack of rules and overabundance of crooked race promoters spurred him to seek out change.

As a result of this, and a desire to increase the popularity of the races, he and others formed racing regulations, and a strong organization to back them up. This process involved partnering with several influential officials, race promoters and drivers.

In short order, stock car racing got not only formal rules and regulations, but a regular schedule and organized championships.

The first NASCAR event was then held on June 19th, 1949 at the Charlotte Speedway. Keeping to the pre-discussed rules on the small dirt track, the events first ever winner was quickly disqualified for his use of illegal rear shocks. This caused the runner-up, Jim Roeper, to claim the event’s enormous two thousand dollar top prize.

In the early days, races were conducted with strictly stock vehicles, featuring no modifications to factory models.

Over the following decade, modifications for the purpose of safety and performance were allowed, and by the 1960s vehicles were completely modified, but maintained their original factory appearance.

Since the first race, the National Association for Stock Car Racing has remained a family-owned and operated venture. The most renowned among its many offerings is the Sprint Cup. This is the most thrilling level of professional racing, and the most profitable series in NASCAR.

Basically, this series consists of a season that is divided into two segments. After the first 26 races, the 10 highest ranked drivers, plus the two drivers with the most race wins who are ranked from 11th through 20th, compete in a final set of 10 races together. Veterans of this series include 70s champion Cale Yarborough and five time winner Jimmie Johnson.

The Nationwide Series features the second-highest level of professional competition. Races are frequently held outside of the United States, seasons are slightly shorter, and the prize money is much smaller. The most famous champion is Kyle Busch.

The Camping World Truck Series is centered on pickup trucks and was formed in 1994. This has become the place for young drivers to make their debut and shift to other racing events.

Aside from these major events, racers have also flocked to the Canadian Tire Series, Mexico’s Corona Series and the Regional Racing Series, which takes place throughout North America. Events are usually named in honor of their sponsor.

A thrilling spectacle for its countless fans, NASCAR has not gone without its share of criticism. This includes the fact that today’s vehicles do not resemble stock cars, and the dominance of the family of the sports creator in all elements of business, policy and decision-making.

In terms of driver safety, NASCAR has only implemented preventative devices following major incidents. Examples include the throttle “kill Switch” that appeared after the death of Adam Petty, and the fire-retardant driver suit after the death of Glen “Fireball” Roberts.

An American sporting event that has since gone global and continues to expand, NASCAR now includes vehicles and drivers from around the world.
Download

You must register to a corporate account to download. Please login

Related Videos

+ see more

More